Greater Anglia application to demolish train station building thrown out

SAVE Britain’s Heritage has stepped in after plans were approved to demolish Salhouse Station. 

SAVE Britain’s Heritage has stepped in after plans were approved to demolish Salhouse Station. - Credit: SAVE Britain's Heritage/Gerard Stamp

Plans to demolish an historic railway station building one stop from Norwich have been quashed. 

Greater Anglia had secured planning permission in October 2021 to tear down the nineteenth century platform building at Salhouse Station. 

The train company had intended to construct new waiting shelters in place of the vacant building citing estimated costs of £250,000 to save the building.

But legal action by SAVE Britain’s Heritage has secured a reprieve for one of the smallest stations on the railway network. 

SAVE has also submitted an application for the urgent listing of Salhouse Station as a building of special architectural and historic interest.  

The independent conservation voice is now working with the Norfolk Historic Buildings Trust on a proposal for the repair and reuse of the building. 

Salhouse Parish Council had previously discussed ways of raising the funds for repairs for the dilapidated building before SAVE stepped in. 

Henrietta Billings, director of SAVE Britain’s Heritage said: “This programme of bulldozing our rural Victorian railway heritage must stop. Replacing these historic buildings with bland bus shelter canopies is a loss for everyone.

Henrietta Billings, from SAVE Britain's Heritage. Pic: SAVE Britain's Heritage.

Henrietta Billings, from SAVE Britain's Heritage. Pic: SAVE Britain's Heritage. - Credit: SAVE Britain's Heritage

"Visitors and passenger alike love these 19th century railway buildings which chart the travelling history of our railways and the people who built them. We call on Greater Anglia to celebrate these buildings and look after them as assets to treasure.”

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Greater Anglia has said it is considering its options regarding the future of the building since the Broadland District Council decision was quashed.

The train company did not lodge an appeal against the decision. 

An artist impression of what the waiting shelters could look like at Salhouse 

An artist impression of what the waiting shelters could look like at Salhouse - Credit: Greater Anglia

A spokeswoman for Greater Anglia said: "As yet, no future sustainable use has been identified for it nor any funding to restore it or support its maintenance.

"While the canopy attached to the single-storey building on the Norwich-bound platform at Salhouse still provides some shelter, the building itself has not been used for more than 50 years. It is not listed.

“Our improvement plans for Salhouse include installing two sustainable shelters, which would significantly improve waiting facilities for passengers.”

A map showing the Bittern Line with Salhouse being the first station north of Norwich

A map showing the Bittern Line with Salhouse being the first station north of Norwich when travelling to Cromer and Sheringham - Credit: Contributed

Melton Constable Trust, which manages the Norfolk Orbital Railway project, also objected to the demolition plans.