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Should Britain end its collaboration with US foreign policy?

PUBLISHED: 12:58 23 January 2017

President Donald Trump speaks on the campaign trail. (AP Photo/John Locher)

President Donald Trump speaks on the campaign trail. (AP Photo/John Locher)

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On Friday, Donald Trump was inaugurated as president of the USA. A public meeting, Trump, What next for foreign policy? will be held on Wednesday, 7pm, at Friends Meeting House, Upper Goat Lane, Norwich, with guest speaker, Billy Hayes, former national general secretary of the Communications Workers Union.

Trump has little experience in foreign policy.

Trying to separate out some of his more bombastic statements during the campaign from likely policy positions is difficult.

His foreign policy appears to be more isolationist and he claims to be in favour of a more conciliatory attitude to Russia, while adopting a more belligerent posture to China.

However, Trump’s vow to ‘destroy’ ISIS and his fighting talk about Iran are proof that his isolationism is limited and calls into question his whole attitude towards the Middle East.

He now regards Israel as the most significant US ally in the region, and suggests moving the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem –a highly contentious and divisive move, that will be strenuously opposed by the Palestinians.

Against the backdrop of spreading war and growing global competition, we face the prospect of not just the most reactionary president in US history but also the most volatile and unpredictable.

Should Britain end its collaboration with US foreign policy that has led to a series of catastrophic wars and poisoned British politics for so long?

Frank Stone, Bethel Street, Norwich.

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