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Norwich is such a dedicated Mod follower of fashion

PUBLISHED: 09:00 29 October 2011

Mod Fashion: From left to right: Gini Dorling-Winterbourne, Kingy, Steve, Craig, Nicola, Lydia, Winnie, Tracy, Mark and Pixie, from the Norwich Mods Scooter Club. Photo: Sean Flood, edited by Gini Dorling-Winterbourne.

Mod Fashion: From left to right: Gini Dorling-Winterbourne, Kingy, Steve, Craig, Nicola, Lydia, Winnie, Tracy, Mark and Pixie, from the Norwich Mods Scooter Club. Photo: Sean Flood, edited by Gini Dorling-Winterbourne.

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The 60s fashion revival has seen the rebirth of the traditional Mod style in Norwich as members of the Norwich Mods Scooter Club celebrate the days of Mod and Ska. EMMA HARROWING reports.

"“My eight-year-old soon loves the look and so does the 14-year-old son of Ian ‘Kingsy’ King the organiser of the Norwich Mods Scooter Club. It’s time for the third generation of Mods.”"

Gini Dorling-Winterbourne, from the Norwich Mods Scooter Club, who is launching a Mod stall at the back of Norwich Market today.

Peter Pan collars, skinny suits and pork pie hats were all seen on the AW11 catwalks. At Norwich Fashion Week, 60s style featured at most shows and with hemlines getting shorter it looks as if the 60s fashion revival is in full swing especially with a bit of a Mod fashion revival in Norwich.

Mods and Modettes parked their scooters outside Cinema City a few weeks ago for the screening of the 1979 film that started the second craze for Mod fashion and music – Quadrophenia.

The Mods are members of the Norwich Mods Scooter Club. The second generation Mods – followers of the 80s Mod revival – are all about the Mod, Ska, Skin, Motown, rockabilly and soul scene in Norwich, with their 60s-style beehives and short cropped hair, mini dresses, Harrington jackets, and the must-have parka.

The Mod style is not just about fashion. The Mod craze of the 60s and the revival in the 80s blurred the relationship between music and fashion. Young people would not only look sharp they would listen to the likes of Northern Soul, Small Faces, Secret Affair, The Jam, Kinks and legends of Mod culture – The Who.

Music and fashion went hand in hand, creating a lifestyle that embraced smart and sometimes expensive Italian clothing and casual attire including shrink-to-fit Levis, the Fred Perry T-shirt, blazers and sports jackets, worn with desert boots, Chelsea boots and Winklepickers.

For women Mod fashion resembled neat, short hair cut in a simple geometric style and twin sets from Marks and Spencer worn with A-line skirts. The trend for wearing trousers and men’s shirts seen in the AW11 collections on the high street was also a look for the original Modette.

Of course the lifestyle wouldn’t be complete without the highly customised Lambretta or Vespa.

Gini Dorling-Winterbourne, a member of Norwich Mods Scooter Club, is launching her stall at the back of Norwich Market today which will sell Mod fashion and paraphernalia including badges, cuffs and novelties.

“There has been an amazing rebirth in Mod fashion in Norwich and there is a group of us that live and breathe Mod style and we dress that way for work, rest and play,” says Gini. “We are mostly second generation Mods but there are some first. There is an increasing number of young people embracing this style.

“My eight-year-old soon loves the look and so does the 14-year-old son of Ian ‘Kingsy’ King the organiser of the Norwich Mods Scooter Club. It’s time for the third generation of Mods.”

Find out how you can get the look of the 2011 Mod by clicking on the photo gallery at the top right of this page.

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