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What happened to the old Tollbar school in Norwich?

PUBLISHED: 15:12 07 September 2011

Boundary public house

Boundary public house

Submitted

Today we need your help to uncover the mystery surrounding the ancient boundary cross in Mile Cross, says Derek James

Do you have any memories of the Tollbar School in Mile Cross or perhaps you know what became of the ancient boundary cross?

If you can help in any way the Jim and Sheila Moore would love to hear from you. They hope Evening News readers can come to their rescue and help them solve a family history riddle.

Sheila’s great grandmother, Roseanna Syder, moved to Rhoda Terrace, off Aylsham Road, from Wramplingham in the late 1890s and she lived there until she died in 1927. Life was not easy for Roseanna, a widow with five children. She was a strong and proud women who worked on the fields where the airport stands today. No benefits in those days – only the workhouse beckoned for the poor and needy.

Her three youngest children, including Daisy, who was Sheila’s nanny, all went to a local school in Mile Cross about a century ago but they can’t find out which one.

According to family stories at least, Daisy went to what was called the “Old Tollbar School” – but where was it? The Norfolk Record Office believe this may have been a local name for the school of the day and there maybe a clue in records which show nearly opposite Rhoda Terrace there was a building called the Tollbar House.

This was near the Boundary public house and this could have been where tolls were collected from travellers entering the city.

And Jim and Sheila sent me this snap, below, showing the Old Mile Cross outside the Boundary.

If you can help with memories of the Tollbar School, or perhaps you know what became of the ancient cross, call Jim and Sheila on 01603 465347 or email exile55552000@yahoo.com


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