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Charity fundraisers, I salute you

PUBLISHED: 10:37 17 November 2017

Thalia doesn't feel awkward offering to sell her pictures to help my charity fundraising; I need to catch up. Picture: submitted.

Thalia doesn't feel awkward offering to sell her pictures to help my charity fundraising; I need to catch up. Picture: submitted.

submitted

I’m trying to overcome my awkwardness about asking for money

Of all the things I don’t like doing, asking for money is near the top.

I have quite a list of dislikes; I’m not keen on the dentist as she always pokes my gums, asks how much tea I drink (a lot) and says my flossing could be better.

I go with the girls and, not wanting to give them a dread of the dentist, I have to keep smiling and say yes a lot, although I’m always left feeling a bit sub-standard.

Asking for money is on a par with a dentist visit for awkwardness.

But I’m going to have to get used to it. I have a place in the London Marathon 2018, and while the training is daunting, I think the real struggle is raising £2000 for my chosen charity.

It’s a charity I care about - Unique, the rare chromosome disorder support group, which helps families with a member with a rare chromosome disorder - but the fundraising involves holding my hand out for cash and I don’t like it!

It is giving me even more respect for those charity workers who accost people in the street to ask for £2 a week to save donkeys or someone’s eyesight, build orphanages, immunise babies, feed the homeless, or find a cure for cancer.

I don’t think I could cope with the rejection as people walk by, or say they already support the RNLI or another heart, children’s or cancer charity.

All that being upbeat and constantly being rejected looks absolutely mortifying to me. I’ve just put my slightly embarrassed request for sponsorship online and I can sense the ‘not another plea for money’ vibes even when I’m not looking at it and wondering whether to add another ‘please’.

I told the girls I want to raise money, but I don’t like asking for it. They don’t understand my discomfort.

“Save up,” says Keola, who saved for her iPad for four years, offering me her pocket money jar.

“I’ll save for you,” she says.

“You can sell my pictures,” offers Thalia.

I need their attitude, I can do this.

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