Well-known landlords to reopen closed riverside pub

Red Lion in Bishopgate, available to rent. Pic: Archant

The Red Lion will be reopened and run by Nick and Briony De'Ath.

The landlords behind well-known venues in Norwich are set to take over a riverside pub which has been closed since last year.

The Red Lion at Bishopgate closed in January last year and has remained empty since.

But it is nearing a new chapter, after Nick and Briony De'Ath - who currently run the Unthank Arms, Trafford Arms, William and Florence and Chambers Cocktail Company - decided to take it on.

Work is now ongoing at the pub, which is owned by the Great Hospital Charity.

Mrs De'Ath said it was a beautiful pub in a fantastic location, and said they were thrilled to take on a "Norwich landmark and give it a new lease of life".

"We plan to be open all-day, every day serving coffee, beers, wines and great food," she said.

"Inside will be decorated in a fairly traditional style - we’re keen to keep as much as we can of the original features that make a pub a pub as we can - but we’re adding in some creature comforts such wood-burning stoves, comfortable seating and updated facilities.

"Outside there’s heaps of space which we’re redeveloping to make it even more inviting. The Red Lion Bishopgate has always been a popular pub for NCFC fans on match days so we’re looking to continue this."

FOR EDP NORFOLK Norwich City of Ale feature - Trafford Arms. Picture: Matthew Usher.

FOR EDP NORFOLK Norwich City of Ale feature - Trafford Arms. Picture: Matthew Usher. - Credit: Matthew Usher

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She said it had been challenging making changes during the pandemic, but said they had been working closely with the Great Hospital, and hoped to open as soon as they were allowed under coronavirus restrictions.

Andrew Barnes, chief executive of the Great Hospital, said: "We are very proud of the Red Lion. It has been a public house trading under that name, owned by the Great Hospital, for nearly 150 years and is part of our extraordinary heritage.  

"The pub was named after the lion insignia part of the arms of Norwich, which depict the royal lion of England and Norwich Castle."

Andrew Barnes, the chief executive of The Great Hospital in Bishopgate. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Andrew Barnes, the chief executive of The Great Hospital in Bishopgate. Picture: Sonya Duncan - Credit: Sonya Duncan

He said the Bishop Bridge, which the pub sits next to, had been built in 1340. Elizabeth I crossed it when visiting Norwich in 1578.

"The Great Hospital has invested in a substantial refurbishment of the building to bring it back to its former glory and we cannot wait for it to open again as an excellent pub at the centre of our local community," he said. 

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