Cheer up Norwich City fans! Top tips from mood experts after latest loss

Following Norwich City comes with highs and lows for supporters 

Following Norwich City comes with highs and lows for supporters - Credit: Ben Hardy

Canaries fans might be feeling down in the dumps after yet ANOTHER Premier League defeat. 

Talk of relegation among disheartened Norwich City fanatics is growing after the 3-1 loss to Watford at Carrow Road on Saturday. 

While some may have vented their frustrations immediately after the game, for some the loss can take much longer to get over. 

But despite the defeat there are still reasons to be cheerful. 

Paul Wood, of Norfolk Anxiety Recovery in Bank Plain, Norwich, said he has experienced fans coming to him with football-related issues over the years. 

Norwich City captain Grant Hanley and new signing Mathias Normann process a 3-1 Premier League defeat to Watford

Norwich City captain Grant Hanley and new signing Mathias Normann sum up the mood after a 3-1 Premier League defeat to Watford - Credit: Paul Chesterton/Focus Images Ltd

"It definitely has an impact on how people feel," Mr Wood said. 


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The anxiety specialist said Norwich fans can get over the club's current rut by identifying exactly how they feel. 

Mr Wood said: "Do we feel angry, sad, frustrated or disappointed?

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"Naming how you feel allows you to process your feelings so that they quickly ebb away rather than rising up and creating stress." 

A previous example was when Mr Wood was visited by a Canaries fan who stopped being able to watch football after Norwich lost 5-0 to Brighton in 2016.

Paul Wood from Norfolk Anxiety Recovery 

Paul Wood from Norfolk Anxiety Recovery - Credit: Contributed

Mr Wood said: "After speaking with him, we found out the pain of losing had accumulated after each match because he couldn't process how he felt.

"He had bottled up each loss, which made it gradually more and more stressful to watch them lose. The feeling he felt uncomfortable experiencing was sadness."

After identifying his sadness, the client was able to watch football without the pain endured before through the support of Mr Wood.

Dr Rod Lambert, of Regain Control in Saker Close, said: "I can see where it comes from. People care a lot about their teams.

"Something affecting mood to that extent would be more than one issue in my opinion." 

Chartered psychologist and British Psychological Society member, professor Mike Berry, said: "The negative side of football teams losing is unfortunately an increase in domestic violence.

 "A lot of females dread football days because if their partner's team lose then they will come home in a bad mood.

"Norwich unfortunately came up on a wave of glorious victory from the Championship but are not up to the standard required for the Premier League."

How Norwich fans react to a loss? 

City's well-known supporter and quiz expert David 'Spud' Thornhill said he has learnt to get over defeats much better than he used to.

Mr Thornhill said: "A defeat used to ruin my weekend and I would not be in the best of moods on a Saturday night. 

David Thornhill with his match programmes and memorabilia. He had to step up as fourth official in N

David Thornhill with his Norwich City memorabilia and programmes - Credit: Archant

"Don't get me wrong I was still feeling a bit down in the dumps on Saturday but it was nowhere near as bad as I would have been 20 years ago.

"It does help having a little girl to change my mood." 

Robin Sainty, chairman of the Canaries Trust, said Covid has helped changed his attitude and he feels grateful to be able to watch live football again regardless of the result. 

Canaries Trust chairman Robin Sainty described the club's ranking as 'well-deserved'. Picture: Archa

Robin Sainty - Credit: Archant

He added: "People react in different ways but when all is said and done, it's just a game of football. When people are dying every day it does bring some sort of perspective." 

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