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Norwich scoops second major architecture award

PUBLISHED: 08:04 10 October 2019 | UPDATED: 10:55 10 October 2019

The innovative project won the sustainable category at the RegioStars awards in Brussels. Picture: Hudson Architects

The innovative project won the sustainable category at the RegioStars awards in Brussels. Picture: Hudson Architects

Archant

An architects in Norwich is celebrating after winning a prestigious European award.

Cob houses will be low-carbon and more energy efficient. Picture: InterregCob houses will be low-carbon and more energy efficient. Picture: Interreg

Hudson Architects on St Andrew's Street beat 30 entrants across Europe to win the sustainability category at this year's RegioStars awards in Brussels.

The triumphant project, called CobBauge, is based on sustainable cob houses and involved the firm, the University of Plymouth, Earth Building UK and Ireland and partners in France.

Project CobBauge impressed the judges of the European Commission�s RegioStars Awards 2019 for its work on developing innovative versions of �cob�. Picture: InterregProject CobBauge impressed the judges of the European Commission�s RegioStars Awards 2019 for its work on developing innovative versions of �cob�. Picture: Interreg

Environmentally-friendly Cob houses, which are built using a mixture of earth, natural fibre and water, have existed in the South of England and Northern France for centuries.

MORE: From scandal-hit site to the UK's best new building - Norwich council homes win Stirling Prize

The project scooped up the top prize at the event in Brussels. Picture: InterregThe project scooped up the top prize at the event in Brussels. Picture: Interreg

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But until now, the houses had not met modern building regulations.

And the innovative project could make an important contribution to climate change by reducing of carbon dioxide emissions and improve energy efficiency, according to CobBauge project manager Karen Hood-Cree.

Practice director at Hudson Architects Anthony Hudson added: "According to latest research as buildings become more efficient, embodied energy becomes a significantly higher proportion of total life cycle energy use. Given that we have an urgent need to minimise our impact on the world around us, the low embodied energy of CobBauge represents a major step towards a more sustainable way of building."

Professor Steve Goodhew, principal investigator on CobBauge and a member of the University's Environmental Building Group, said: "To win this award is clear recognition of the importance of this work in terms of exploring sustainable alternatives to conventional building materials and methods, it is also well-deserved recognition of all the hard work undertaken so far by the project team, from colleagues at the University, to partners in France and here in the UK."

However, the search is now on to find a building project to trial the new material and construction technique on.

Norfolk-based homeowners and builders with potential projects are encouraged to contact the project and potential homes will be monitored on energy use, thermal conditions and indoor air quality.

Contact Hudson Architects here https://hudsonarchitects.co.uk/

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