'Excitement' among teens as 16 and 17-year-olds book vaccines

News that a coronavirus vaccine is imminent is reason to be optimistic rather than pessimistic, says

Professor Sarah Gilbert, a graduate of the UEA, has overseen the development of an effective coronavirus vaccine - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

For 16 and 17-year-olds, the Covid-19 vaccination roll out is only just beginning.

Months after the programme started in December 2020, some teenagers have now been invited to book their jabs.  

This picture depicts a young female clinician using a syringe to inject a concept COVD-19 liquid vac

Rachel Moore describes having the Covid-19 vaccine as like having a Get Out of Jail Free card in Monopoly - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

With a buzz on social media full of youngsters with feelings of apprehension or excitement posed by the opportunity, we were able to catch up with some of the regions young people to see how they feel.  

Lucy Kiybet, who has just turned 17, said that she feels a lot safer she will have that extra level of protection “even if it doesn’t always turn out to be 100pc effective.”  

Lucy Kiybet, 17 share her views on being invited to get her vaccination. 

Lucy Kiybet, 17 share her views on being invited to get her vaccination. - Credit: Lucy Kiybet

She added “I think other young people should at least have the opportunity to get their vaccination, because if we look at things, young people are more social than those who have been given their vaccine already and so are more likely to heighten the spread of the virus.” 


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Felicity Harvey, 17, who works in catering at the cliff hotel said she feels a lot better. “It makes it a lot safer for all of us. Young people mostly work face to face with customers.” 

Felicity Harvey, 17 shares her views on being invited to get her vaccination. 

Felicity Harvey, 17 shares her views on being invited to get her vaccination. - Credit: Felicity Harvey

Miss Harvey explained that she is fortunate to not feel any apprehension towards getting the vaccine but acknowledged that there will be people who see it as an opportunity to take advantage.

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She said: “There will always be young people who use things like this as an excuse to take time out of school and college, but as long as they are safe and get it done, it is their choice what they would like to do afterwards.”  

Seanie Nye, 17, said: “It makes me feel happier knowing that I have some contribution to my safety as well as everyone around me especially with family and work, I am hoping to get my first one done today. 

Lucy Kiybet, 17 share her views on being invited to get her vaccination. 

Seanie Nye, 17 shares her views on being invited to get her vaccination. - Credit: Seanie Nye

“It allows young people to feel more involved in the improvement of the pandemic by allowing us to have the opportunity to be vaccinated.” 

If you are a young person who has a story to tell or would be interested in having your voice heard in the paper, please contact Sophie Skyring via sophie.skyring@archant.co.uk    

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