Why you should photograph your favourite Norwich building from a fresh perspective

Norwich's City hall. Photograph your favourite Norwich building and send it to samuel.russell@archan

Norwich's City hall. Photograph your favourite Norwich building and send it to samuel.russell@archant.co.uk - Credit: Archant © 2004

In Norwich, every building tells a story. And every building – from the futuristic UEA ziggurats to the city's Tudor merchant houses – triggers different meanings and memories for different people.

City Hall seen through a market stall in Norwich. Photograph your favourite Norwich building and sen

City Hall seen through a market stall in Norwich. Photograph your favourite Norwich building and send it to samuel.russell@archant.co.uk - Credit: Archant © 2006

That is why we are encouraging readers to share their unique perspective on the Fine City's architecture by sending us photos of buildings seen in a fresh way.

• City of Stories flash fiction: Lost and Found by Joanne Austin Olsen

• What is your favourite Norwich building? City of Stories photo challenge

St Peter Mancroft and Millenium Plain in Norwich. Photograph your favourite Norwich building and sen

St Peter Mancroft and Millenium Plain in Norwich. Photograph your favourite Norwich building and send it to samuel.russell@archant.co.uk - Credit: Archant © 2009

We are setting the challenge as the City of Stories campaign, to promote Norwich by sharing its tales and tapping into its prestigious literary pedigree, moves into its second week – titled Spires and Ziggurats.


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Writers' Centre Norwich has contributed another work of flash fiction, on the theme of memories evoked by architecture.

And free tours will be running this week to help people discover the city's architecture, including the cathedral.

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The story of how Norwich's Cathedral came to be begins in 1094, when a Norman man named Herbert de Losinga committed a sin.

He paid the king of England, King William Rufus or 'William the Red,' to make him Bishop of East Anglia.

News of this sin quickly spread across Europe, ultimately reaching the Vatican, and the ears of Pope Urban II.

The sin of simony had a price.

Bishop Herbert was told that the only way to atone for his sin was to build a new cathedral.

The first stone was laid in 1096, and it would be another 49 years until the last.

While there are centuries of history to be found at the cathedral, the already iconic UEA ziggurats look to the future.

Designed in the 1960s by the acclaimed British architect Denys Lasdun, the fortress-like structures were based on massive ancient structures found in the Mesopotamian valley.

The UEA ziggurats are terraced pyramids, glazed with glass.

Their layout gives each student personal privacy and a stunning view, while simultaneously creating an intensely social environment.

Free tours of Norwich Cathedral will take place this week, with a maximum limit of 20 people per tour.

They take place tomorrow at 11am, 1pm and 3pm, but places must be booked at www.facebook.com/norwichcityofstories

• We want to see your photos of Norwich architecture from a different perspective. The best submissions will be printed in the paper next week. Email samuel.russell@archant.co.uk

• City of Stories is run by Visit Norwich, funded by sponsors including Norwich BID and backed by the Evening News. See www.cityofstories.co.uk

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