What are the most haunted streets in Norwich?

Touring company, Norwich Ghost Walks, talks about the most haunted streets in Norwich.

Norwich Ghost Walks has been doing tours of the most haunted streets for 25 years - Credit: Archant / Norwich Ghost Walks

Wandering through the city streets people may not realise the rich, and sometimes bloody, history that surrounds them.

But Norwich is an ancient city steeped in history - often violent. And with that, many believe spooks and spectres lurk around the streets and in the historic buildings.

But where are the most haunted parts of the Fine City? 

Basil Marples, owner of Norwich Ghost Walks which is celebrating 25 years in business, said: "The building located at 19 Magdalen Street has passed through the hands of many owners since it was built more than 300 years ago.

19 Magdalen Street is said to home the ghost of murdered working girl 'Sarah'.

19 Magdalen Street is said to home the ghost of murdered working girl 'Sarah'. - Credit: Archant 2018 - Credit: Sonya Duncan

"There have been multiple reported strange and unexplained activities - the source of which are said to be the ghost of murdered working girl 'Sarah' - who met her death in 1860.

"Another is one of the oldest streets in Norwich, Elm Hill, has been at the centre of reports of unexplained footsteps that are attributed to the mad monk ghost of Father Ignatius."

The Norwich Ghost Walk includes areas such as Magdalen Street and Elm Hill but starts at another ghostly location, The Adam and Eve pub.

Elm Hill in Norwich is though to be haunted with the mad monk ghost of Father Ignatius . Credit: Lydia Taylor

Elm Hill in Norwich is though to be haunted with the mad monk ghost of Father Ignatius . Credit: Lydia Taylor - Credit: Lydia Taylor

Most Read

Basil, also known as the 'Shadowcaster', added: "It's the oldest pub in the region, being established in 1249, is said to be home to the ghost of Lord Sheffield.

"Stabbed in 1549, during Kett's Rebellion, he was dragged to the former inn on the site of that is now the Adam and Eve."

Starting 25 years ago Basil recalled the first ghostly walk and how the popularity has grown.

The Adam & Eve, the oldest pub in Norwich where Norwich Ghost Walk tours meet, is said to have a ghost.

The Adam & Eve, the oldest pub in Norwich where Norwich Ghost Walk tours meet, is said to have a ghost. - Credit: Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant

"One chilly evening in March 1998, a mysterious figure stepped out of the shadows," he added. 

"Known only as ghostly Dave he began to recall fantastical stories of the history of Norwich and the reports of unusual happenings in the streets and buildings around them.

Norwich Ghost Walks celebrates 25 years of touring the city's most haunted streets.

Norwich Ghost Walks celebrates 25 years of touring the city's most haunted streets. - Credit: Norwich Ghost Walks

"It feels special to keep the history of Norwich alive with stories of the people who lived in our fine city having many adventures - and misadventures - on the very same cobblestones we still walk on today.

"It is great to keep the ghost walks going, from inception 25 years ago, with a long lasting legacy of street performance and the art of storytelling."

Rebel fell! What was Kett's Rebellion?

One of the most famous ghosts in Norwich is Lord Sheffield who was killed during Kett's Rebellion.

Lord Sheffield was killed in a street near Cathedral Close when he fell from his horse, removed his helmet assuming the customary capture and eventual ransom, but instead was killed by a butcher.

But what exactly was Kett's Rebellion?

Kett's Rebellion started back in 1549 during the reign of King Edward VI.

It stemmed from a dispute over land in Norfolk with rebels who would destroy fences which were erected by wealthy landowners.

The rebels were led by Robert Kett who, with his rebels in Wymondham, met up with forces in Norwich before setting up camp in Mousehold Heath.

On July 29 Kett and his 16,000 strong army of rebels stormed Norwich and took over the city.

Robert Kett was eventually captured and hanged from the walls of Norwich Castle on December 7, 1549.