Flower Power! Art installation transforms station eyesore

The new flower display at Sale Yard in Wymondham.

The new flower display at Sale Yard in Wymondham. - Credit: Kathryn Cross

Green-fingered volunteers have rolled up their sleeves to transform a blight at the heart of their town. 

A jungle of overhanging brambles and bags of rubbish were cleared from the perimeter of the former Sale Yard opposite Wymondham railway station.

The graffiti stained boards have been repainted before colourful ‘flowers’ were attached to create a Blooming Fence.

A volunteer clearing the Sale Yard area of Wymondham.

A volunteer clearing the Sale Yard area of Wymondham. - Credit: Kathryn Cross

The volunteer event, which took place on August 29, was organised by a new task force, called the Wymondham Eyesore Action Group, set up by resident Kim Carsok.

The group had become concerned about the bad impression the area gave to visitors arriving by train.


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Sale Yard closed many years ago and the site has changed hands more than once. But it has never been developed and had been left to deteriorate.

After gaining permission from the current owners to improve the boundary the group was joined by members of Wymondham in Bloom and town councillors to make the area a talking point for all the right reasons.

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Ms Carsok said: "We felt we had waited long enough for someone else to do something so we decided to be that someone. The idea is that residents can add to the Blooming Fence over time - it is our Norfolk version of the popular padlocks on a bridge idea to show our love for our town. All you have to do is paint a plastic bottle bottom with nail varnish, acrylic paint or permanent markers to resemble a flower. Punch a hole in the side and attach it to the fence wherever you fancy with wire or a cable tie".

Wymondham volunteers in the Sale Yard area which has been cleared up and transformed.

Wymondham volunteers in the Sale Yard area which has been cleared up and transformed. - Credit: Kathryn Cross

Care home residents and school children made many of the first flowers to go on the fence.

The volunteers were supported by the Industrial Gardener and Sarah Ashcroft from the town’s StART Studio, who advised on the Blooming Fence.

The group is planning more volunteer work days when they will create more art and prepare the ground for sowing wildflower seeds.

If you would like to get involved contact Ms Carsok by emailing wymbloom@gmail.com


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