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Three Norwich schools get national award

PUBLISHED: 07:30 03 June 2010 | UPDATED: 17:02 01 July 2010

Sewell Park College staff and pupils pick up their enterprise award.

Sewell Park College staff and pupils pick up their enterprise award.

Steve Downes

Youngsters who set up a pizza firm are among those from three Norwich schools who have picked up an entrepreneurship award.

Pupils and staff from Clare School on South Park Avenue, Sewell Park College on St Clement's Hill and Woodside Pupil Referral Unit on Witard Road were given a national award for making an excellent contribution to entrepreneurship and creating an enterprising workforce for the future.

Youngsters who set up a pizza firm are among those from three Norwich schools who have picked up an entrepreneurship award.

Pupils and staff from Clare School on South Park Avenue, Sewell Park College on St Clement's Hill and Woodside Pupil Referral Unit on Witard Road were given a national award for making an excellent contribution to entrepreneurship and creating an enterprising workforce for the future.

To receive the award, the schools had to come up with a range of enterprising activities.

Teenagers from Woodside PRU set up their own pizza company, and sold handmade goods at a Christmas fair, while students from Clare School created a Romeo and Juliet book for parents, organised drama productions and prepared staff lunches.

Sewell Park pupils have been growing and selling fruit and vegetables from the school allotment and running a stationery business called Doodles. They also visited Hethel Engineering Centre, Aviva, Norwich City Football Club and the Archant newsroom to learn how successful local businesses are managed.

The students and teachers came together last week at the Open youth venue, on Bank Plain, to deliver a presentation about their enterprising activities before receiving certificates from the High Sheriff of Norfolk, Charles Barrett.

Mr Barrett talked about the history of the Norwich economy from Saxon times to the development of the wool trade and the Gurney Bank, highlighting the important role enterprise had played in the city throughout the decades.

The event was organised by Go For it! Enterprising Norwich, a Norwich City Council programme, which has supported a range of enterprising activities in Norwich schools. The programme has also provided funding to support the schools through the assessment process for the award.

One of the aims of the programme is to get young people thinking about the role that business and enterprise plays in the local economy, while helping them develop entrepreneurial skills.

To date, Go For It! has provided funding for more than 2,500 Norwich pupils to get involved in enterprising, educational activities.

Development manager Tim Bacon said: “It's fantastic that three more schools from the city have achieved this national enterprising standard, building on the success of the four who achieved the standard last year.

“I am confident that the exciting enterprise experience each student has had will reap dividends. We hope it has given the teenagers the confidence and realisation that they have every opportunity to become their own boss in the future.”

Emma Van Deventner, director of enterprise in the community at Sewell Park College, said: “From decision-making to teamwork, problem solving, communication and even taking risks, all of these skills will be so important for their futures whether in education or work.”

t To find out more, visit www.goforitnorwich.co.uk.

t Have you got an education story for the Evening News? Contact Steve Downes on 01603 772495 or email steve.downes@archant.co.uk

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