Why city youngsters are turning their backs on fast fashion giants

Milly and Laura Hodges (inset) shop only sustainably. 

Milly and Laura Hodges (inset) shop only sustainably. - Credit: Jubilique/Abbi Hodges

City youngsters are shopping only with sustainable brands in a bid to kick fast fashion. 

Young eco-warriors are ditching the big brands in favour of doing their bit for the planet.

Laura Hodges only lets her daughter Milly, 12, wear sustainable brands. 

Mrs Hodges explained: “We’re often told about the poor conditions in factories where these clothes are made, but not often told about the environmental impact."

Milly, 12 and mother Laura Hodges from Norwich talk about sustainable fashion. 

Milly, 12 and mother Laura Hodges from Norwich talk about sustainable fashion. - Credit: Laura Hodges

She said: "More young people should be aware of this issue, climate change is the biggest threat to humanity. 


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“We must raise our children with an understanding of the impact that their purchasing habits will have on the world and their future.” 

Milly, 12 and mother Laura Hodges from Norwich talk about sustainable fashion. 

Milly, 12 and mother Laura Hodges from Norwich talk about sustainable fashion. - Credit: Laura Hodges

Milly said she often feels left out when shopping with friends: “They spend all their money in Primark because it’s cheaper and I can’t get as much because sustainable shops are understandably more expensive. 

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“I am really interested in fashion and am represented by Sandra Reynolds Model agency - I want to be able to influence people to shop more responsibly and sustainably for all our futures.” 

However, lots of young people feel they are not always fortunate enough to have the option to shop sustainably

Harrison Elvin, 20, from Costessey, said: "I love to shop in charity shops, and I do it as often as I can, but it isn't always easy."

Molly Allington, 20, who is a self proclaimed lover of charity shops and depop added: "The pricing of clothes isn't always obtainable so it’s hard to contribute to sustainable fashion as much as I would like"

Laura Gill a 23-year-old from Norwich added: "Sustainable fashion isn't always available on the high street so it is hard not to make impulse purchases.

"Sustainable brands tend to be expensive and mostly online, i've yet to break my cycle of purchasing cheap and often."

She added: "There is a privilege in the labour required to research, create and wait for clothing items which most people cannot afford."

If you are a young person who has a story to tell or would be interested in having your voice heard in the paper, please contact Sophie Skyring via sophie.skyring@archant.co.uk     

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