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Decision day for factory storing 150,000 tonnes of rubbish near retail park

PUBLISHED: 13:57 15 October 2020 | UPDATED: 13:57 15 October 2020

Tim East, Norfolk County Council member for Costessey. Picture: Bill Smith

Tim East, Norfolk County Council member for Costessey. Picture: Bill Smith

Archant © 2014

Tomorrow is D-Day for a major plan which could see a former scrap metal site near a large retail park turned into a factory to store thousands of tonnes of waste.

The entrance to the site which could be used for a new Veolia waste transfer station on Longwater Industrial Esate in Costessey. Picture: Sophie WyllieThe entrance to the site which could be used for a new Veolia waste transfer station on Longwater Industrial Esate in Costessey. Picture: Sophie Wyllie

The proposal by Veolia ES (UK) Ltd to build a waste transfer station off Ernest Gage Avenue on the Longwater Industrial Estate, Costessey, near Longwater Retail Park, has attracted opposition from Costessey Town Council, Costessey county councillor Tim East and residents.

It is being debated by Norfolk County Council’s planning committee tomorrow and has been recommended for approval by officers.

The town council, which has recommended the plan is rejected, said it was “concerned that local residents will be subjected to noise, smells, nuisance and disturbance”.

It added the proposal would create more traffic movements.

The area on William Frost Way, Costessey, where councillors want a pedestrian crossing. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANThe area on William Frost Way, Costessey, where councillors want a pedestrian crossing. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

MORE: Plans lodged for large waste station close to busy retail park and housing development

Mr East, who has also objected, suggested “a Section 106 contribution be agreed to upgrade the pedestrian crossing on William Frost Way to ensure pedestrian safety, and that a sum of money be paid towards the upgrading of the Longwater Interchange to mitigate the increased traffic movements as it is so congested”.

According to planning documents he and the town council wanted Veolia to make a Section 106 contribution to a potential pedestrian crossing on William Frost Way, off Ernest Gage Avenue, to improve safety for people crossing that road.

MORE: Council confirms it will investigate new crossing on busy road

The planning report concluded the proposal would not have any unacceptable impacts on the nearby roads and a contribution to highway improvements was not needed.

Other objections from residents include an increase in rats and gulls, devaluation of local residential properties and air pollution.

There have also been suggestions the factory should be built on the NDR away from residential areas and busy roads.

If approved the site wouldd act as a “short-term storage point” for 149,000 tonnes of non-hazardous household, commercial and industrial waste, including food, dry mixed recyclables and non-recyclable general waste, each year.

The rubbish would then be driven to other sites for “further recycling or recovery” and the 24/7 site, which would operate on bank holidays and employ 44 people, could generate 292 two-way vehicle movements per day.

A supporting statement by Veolia said: “The planning application proposal represents a key example of a development proposal that is addressing the challenge of climate change because the proposed waste transfer station will assist in diverting waste materials away from landfill and sent on for further recycling or recovery instead.”


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