Meet Norwich's paranormal creatures ... and how to tell when they're near

The shadow of the Gildencroft Bogey at the Gildencroft tudor cottages near St Augustines Street. Insert: Dr Paul Lee

The shadow of the Gildencroft Bogey at the Gildencroft tudor cottages near St Augustines Street. Insert: Dr Paul Lee - Credit: Archant/Paul Lee

The Fine City has rich a history stretching back thousands of years, so it is no surprise that there have been a plethora of 'paranormal' events.

Here are some of Norwich's most well-known spooky stories and how to tell if you're experiencing a paranormal event.

A tour of Tombland. Augustine Steward House and Tombland Alley, where remains of one of the two Roma

Augustine Steward House, where the Lady in Grey resides - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2019

The Lady in Grey

This young woman was forced to eat her family after being locked in her plague-ridden home with their bodies. She now walks through the walls of Tombland.

A woman who used to work in Augustine Steward House recalled: "Nobody liked going into the basement. The door would close on its own, the handle would move. One of the other shops would have stuff flying off the shelves too, she made herself known."

Weeping White Ghost Horse

This is the tragic story of a young woman who fell under the ice on the River Yare in Trowse and drowned as her son watched from the bank.

Since the woman’s death, several people have reported seeing a phantom white ghost horse that sheds tears.

The shadow of the Gildencroft Bogey at the Gildencroft tudor cottages near St Augustines Street. Pic

The shadow of the Gildencroft Bogey at the Gildencroft tudor cottages near St Augustines Street. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Gildencroft Bogey

Since the 1880s, a strange creature has been spotted lurking in the shadows of St Augustine's Street. For centuries, the bogeyman served as a warning to children to stay on a righteous path or face punishment.

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The beast was once described as "big and hairy, eyes glowing in the dark, big as tea-saucers, big sharp teeth and its breath most noxious". 

legendary spectral hound Black Shuck.

The Black Shuck - Credit: Archant Library/Sam Robbins

Black Shuck

This Norfolk native is a black dog with shaggy hair "as big as a calf and as noiseless as death". He has stalked the county since the 1500s.

He is said to have eyes like saucers and breath like fire. Black Shuck can foretell your impending death or be a guardian. 

Most famous for stalking the streets of Bungay, Black Shuck has also been spotted in Norwich.

UFOs 

In 1954, a series of Unidentified Flying Objects were seen in the skies above Norwich. 

People on Alexandra Road and Lawson Road reported seeing a "very bright round ball" moving across the sky.

How to know if you've experienced the paranormal

Author of The Ghosts of King's Lynn and West Norfolk, Dr Paul Lee, said: "Paranormal events tend to happen when people are least expecting them. If you go somewhere that's haunted then things can become blown out of proportion.

"However, people don't tend to notice things until they're pointed out. Paranormal experiences really depend on personal perception.

"Lots of the tips for ghosts specifically are well-known - hearing footsteps or voices, feeling cold spots or like you're being watched and doors closing on their own."

Dr Paul Lee

Dr Paul Lee, author of The Ghosts of King's Lynn and West Norfolk - Credit: Dr Paul Lee

Chairman of the Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena, Chris Jensen Romer, said: "Paranormal events are usually normal events where the explanation is not understood. They might be mysterious to us but perfectly normal once we find out what was really going on. 

"There might be phenomena that are outside our current scientific knowledge, so our science will expand to include them; the way Giant Squid went from being tall stories from sailors to part of our knowledge."

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