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Can you spot these insects? Help take part in Norfolk wildlife survey

PUBLISHED: 00:00 01 June 2020

A hummingbird hawkmoth, broad-bodied chaser and a tree bumblebee - three insects Norfolk Wildlife Trust is hoping members of the public can spot for a survey. Photo: David Martin.

A hummingbird hawkmoth, broad-bodied chaser and a tree bumblebee - three insects Norfolk Wildlife Trust is hoping members of the public can spot for a survey. Photo: David Martin.

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Can you spot the messenger of good tidings, the creature of habit and the gardener’s helpful bumblebee this summer?

Broad-bodied chaser. Photo: David Martin.Broad-bodied chaser. Photo: David Martin.

Following a new report which shows a drastic decline in insects, Norfolk Wildlife Trust is asking people to record sightings of three in Norfolk: the tree bumblebee, hummingbird hawkmoth and broad-bodied chaser.

The survey launches on Monday (June 1) and runs until the end of August.

Authored by Professor David Goulson and published by The Wildlife Trusts as part of the Action for Insects campaign, the report found 41pc of insect species now face extinction around the world, while population declines were widespread across other insect species.

The report also highlighted the vital part played by insects in human food production and in their support of countless other birds, mammals and plants.

Hummingbird hawkmoth. Photo: David Martin.Hummingbird hawkmoth. Photo: David Martin.

Gemma Walker, senior community officer at Norfolk Wildlife Trust, said: “Insects are one of the key building blocks of life on which we and countless other familiar species from hedgehogs to garden birds rely.

“We have picked three insects which we hope people in Norfolk will spot in their gardens and on their local patch, and are asking all sightings to be added to our wildlife spotter map.”

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Britain’s dragonfly species are being threatened due to habitat destruction and the effects of climate change.

Tree bumblebee. Photo: David Martin.Tree bumblebee. Photo: David Martin.

Data collected by the British Dragonfly Society show that 36pc of UK dragonfly species are in decline.

Broad-bodied chasers are known to visit garden ponds, which can be a real haven for dragonflies and damselflies.

According to Professor David Goulson’s report, 23 bee and flower visiting wasp species have become extinct in the UK since 1850.

Tree bumblebees first arrived in the UK in 2001, probably from mainland Europe, and seem to particularly like gardens and woodlands, often seen nesting in bird boxes.

According to Butterfly Conservation, many individual species of moth have declined dramatically in recent decades and more than 60 became extinct in the twentieth century.

The hummingbird hawkmoth is anecdotally increasing in Norfolk, with more sightings being recorded.

The spotter map can be found at www.norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk/wildlife-in-norfolk/wildlife-spotter-survey










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