Ski club wins funding to get more disabled people into the sport

Members and volunteers of the adaptive group at Norfolk Snowsports Club in Trowse. Picture: Lauren D

Members and volunteers of the adaptive group at Norfolk Snowsports Club in Trowse - Credit: Lauren De Boise

One of the country's largest dry ski slopes has won £5,000 worth of funding from Toyota to help disabled people get into the sport.

Norfolk Snowsports Club, which has been running adaptive ski and tube sessions at Trowse for several years, desperately needed to replace its 20-year-old equipment.

At the top of its list was more comfortable seating and strapping, better head support and safety harnesses.

Programme coordinator Richard Roberts said: "The £5,000 received from Toyota Parasport Fund will be added to our additional fundraising efforts to buy specialist equipment, enabling some of the most disabled children and adults to use our facility."

Members and volunteers of the adaptive group at Norfolk Snowsports Club. Front: Harley Carey (6) and

Members and volunteers of the adaptive group at Norfolk Snowsports Club. Front: Harley Carey (6) and Kieran Young. Back: Volunteers George Dudley and Richard Roberts. Picture: Lauren De Boise. - Credit: Lauren De Boise

Since the Toyota Parasport Fund was set up in 2019 in partnership with the British Paralympic Association and Sport England, more than £390,000 has been pumped into the facilities of 93 successful applicants - one of which was the Snowsports Club.


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The manager for the local Toyota dealership, Marcus Rutledge, met with its volunteers.

He said: "Having spoken to some of the parents and hearing how they were told this kind of activity was unlikely for their child, and then seeing the smiles as they came down the slope should give everyone a positive outlook on life."

John Churcher successfully learning to ski at Norfolk Snowsports Club, despite being registered blin

John Churcher successfully learning to ski at Norfolk Snowsports Club, despite being registered blind deaf, with 3% vision, and 50% hearing. With him is his adaptive instructor, Sarah Bell, right, and John's supportive friend, Lauren Bean. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2019


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