Search

‘They should pick it up’ - Children tackle dog poo on streets by turning bottles into emergency bag dispensers

PUBLISHED: 06:30 23 February 2020

Thomas Gibson, 7, from Costessey, and his mum Rachel Gibson next to a home made emergency dog poo bag holder in Costessey as part of Beavers. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Thomas Gibson, 7, from Costessey, and his mum Rachel Gibson next to a home made emergency dog poo bag holder in Costessey as part of Beavers. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Archant

It causes anger, annoyance and health concerns across many British streets.

Thomas Gibson, 7, from Costessey, and his mum Rachel Gibson next to a home made emergency dog poo bag holder in Costessey as part of Beavers. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANThomas Gibson, 7, from Costessey, and his mum Rachel Gibson next to a home made emergency dog poo bag holder in Costessey as part of Beavers. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

But a group of children in Costessey, Easton and Bawburgh are trying to tackle the problem of dog poo thanks to a social media platform.

Members of the 27th Norwich (New Costessey) Beavers made 16 emergency dog poo bag dispensers out of 500ml plastic bottles which they have tied up to lampposts across their communities.

It was the idea of Jan Moll, Beaver Scout leader for the group, who spotted the idea on website Pinterest.

One of the children who made one of the bottles, now hung up on Upper Breckland Road in Costessey, was Thomas Gibson, seven, from Olive Road in New Costessey.

Thomas Gibson, 7, from Costessey, and his mum Rachel Gibson next to a home made emergency dog poo bag holder in Costessey as part of Beavers. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANThomas Gibson, 7, from Costessey, and his mum Rachel Gibson next to a home made emergency dog poo bag holder in Costessey as part of Beavers. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

He said: "It was good to make them because the path is always covered in dog mess. I'm annoyed about people who don't pick up their dog mess. They should pick it up."

You may also want to watch:

Thomas' mother, Rachel Gibson, 39, who also has a one-year-old girl, said: "It is a fantastic idea. I always walk through dog mess while I'm using my pushchair. It is really hard to get off the pushchair wheels. It is disgusting and unhygienic. I think it is laziness that people don't pick it up."

She added there was a big problem of dog poo on streets around schools in Costessey.

Mrs Gibson, a nurse at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, said: "It is beneficial for children to learn things like this. I'm really proud of Thomas."

Mrs Moll, from Easton, said the task of making the bottles was linked into the Beavers earning their World Challenge Award and Community Impact badge.

She said: "We don't want the plastic to end up in the environment. The task made them think about things in their areas. Little things we can do can make a difference. I know as a dog walker that there are certain roads where dog fouling is a problem."

When the bottles are empty people can either refill them with bags or recycle them.

Hilary Elias, Costessey Town Council clerk, said: "It's great when young members of the community come forward with ideas to make Costessey a better place. Anything to help keep the streets clean is good, just as long as the people who use the bags don't throw them on the ground or up in trees and use the dog bins which are provided."


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Norwich Evening News. Click the link in the orange box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Norwich Evening News