Millennials slam 'toxic' advice that they should scrap the gym to buy a home

TV star Kirstie Allsopp has angered Norwich millenials

TV star Kirstie Allsopp has angered Norwich millennials when she told a newspaper that is enrages her when young people say they can't afford a house. - Credit: PA/Getty/Will South

Hard-working city folk are outraged after being told by a TV star to ditch the Disney subscription if they want to get on the property ladder. 

Location, Location, Location presenter Kirstie Allsopp has said she feels "enraged" when young people say they can't afford to buy a home. 

The presenter blamed streaming services, gym memberships and holidays for the shortfall - adding unlike in her youth these are now seen as "standard". 

TV presenter Kirstie Allsopp is backing the Home-Start Christmas appeal

TV presenter Kirstie Allsopp is backing the Home-Start Christmas appeal - Credit: Archant

She said: “It is hard. We've fallen into the trap of saying it's impossible for everybody. It's about where you can buy, not if you can buy." 

The speech caused fury among people in Norwich who are already facing inflation of a 30-year high and a 30pc increase to energy bills come April. 

Those looking to get on the ladder will also have save for nearly a decade to get on the market, data has also shown. 

Cathy Wilson, 28, said: “There's an element of cutting back when needed but not everyone has parents to move back in with while they save. 

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"On top of that most people are paying larger payments each month in rent than a mortgage would be.” 

Cathy Wilson, 28, believed that millennials still need to live their lives

Cathy Wilson, 28, said banks should be doing more to work with people who have proven they can pay a mortgage by paying rent. - Credit: William South

The Norwich PhD student added that banks should accept proof of rent payment as proof of being able to pay a mortgage. 

City filmmaker Hollie Harrington-Ball, 34, said: “This is an unhelpful and frankly toxic mentality.

"You hear it a lot from people who had it a lot easier with the housing market. 

Hollie, 34, from Earlham wants to encourage people to speak up.

Hollie, 34, from Earlham wants to encourage people to speak up. - Credit: Hollie Harrington-Ball

“Cutting back on things might help save a few pennies.

"But nothing will make up for the fact that the average house price is 65 times higher than in 1970 but average wages are only 36 times higher.” 

Wendy Cocks, who is 74 and lives in Norwich, said: “What if us oldies don’t want our offspring to live with us? We took care of them for 20+ years.” 

Wendy Cocks does not want her children to move back home so that they can save for a house

Wendy Cocks does not want her children to move back home to Norwich now that she has retired. - Credit: Wendy Cocks

And Tom Alban said the pressure of buying has turned many in his generation off the idea. 

The 33-year-old comedian said: “Buying a house seems to be this milestone cast down upon us from everyone.  

“I personally couldn't care less about owning a house.” 

Tom Alban has been doing stand up since 2018 and is now taking over as resident MC at Gonzos in Norwich. 

Tom Alban has been doing stand up since 2018 and is now taking over as resident MC at Gonzos in Norwich. - Credit: Aleks Pawlik

How long does it take to save for a house? 

According to 2021 data from YesHomeBuyers it takes people in the East of England almost a decade to save for their first home.

The East of England is one of the regions which has seen one of the largest increases in the length of time it will take them to save up.

Buyers in this region now required to save for 7.7 years.  

That is an increase of 1.6 years since 2012.  

Experts added it may take even longer with 15pc deposits now more standard than 10pc - which was preferred before the pandemic. 

And although data is not yet available for 2022, but this is likely to have stayed at this level or even increased due to the house buying boom in Norfolk which was seen during the pandemic.