Search

‘I find things easier’ - Family’s fight to support eight-year-old suffering from mercury poisoning

PUBLISHED: 08:34 15 May 2020 | UPDATED: 15:06 15 May 2020

Nathan Harris, now eight, with his brother Leon and mum Louise, Picture: Louise Harris

Nathan Harris, now eight, with his brother Leon and mum Louise, Picture: Louise Harris

Archant

The family of an eight-year-old boy have shared their health journey after he displayed symptoms caused by mercury poisoning.

Leon and Nathan Harris. Leon says his brother is easier to play with since the family found mercury in his blood and tried to address it. Picture: Louise HarrisLeon and Nathan Harris. Leon says his brother is easier to play with since the family found mercury in his blood and tried to address it. Picture: Louise Harris

For most of his life Nathan Harris, from Drayton, has experienced concentration and memory problems, being injury-prone and losing his temper at “the flick of a switch”.

His mum Louise said after a test showed he had mercury toxicity in his body, she set out to improve his gut health and address his body’s mineral balance.

Since December, she says Nathan has not injured himself and has seen improvements in his work and temper.

Miss Harris said: “He can now write beautifully, remembers things, listens first time, can follow instructions and doesn’t get angry at the flick of a switch. The transformation is huge.

Nathan Harris, now eight, has transformed according to his mum after they found he had mercury in his body. Picture: Louise HarrisNathan Harris, now eight, has transformed according to his mum after they found he had mercury in his body. Picture: Louise Harris

“It’s been years and years of struggles turned into months of healing, and the results have paid off.”

The 40-year-old said the first time Nathan went to hospital was when he was around six weeks old when he turned blue due to a floppy larynx. He also had acid reflux and constipation.

Growing up, Nathan would find himself in hospital “every other month” from broken bones and injuries which he did not feel the pain from.

When he started school, he found it hard to concentrate and started to become anxious.

Nathan Harris, now eight, attended hospital a number of times for injuries he had sustained. Picture: Louise HarrisNathan Harris, now eight, attended hospital a number of times for injuries he had sustained. Picture: Louise Harris

You may also want to watch:

The family went to the Indigo Centre in Norwich and Nathan was diagnosed with dyslexia, dyspraxia and was seem to be displaying signs of ASD / ADHD.

Miss Harris decided to move Nathan to Horsford Primary School and praised the work of staff for the support they have given him.

Miss Harris said: “I went on a quest to help him. Some people told me I couldn’t accept the labels he was given, but the truth was, I couldn’t accept that there was nothing I could do to help him.

Nathan Harris, from Drayton, Picture: Louise HarrisNathan Harris, from Drayton, Picture: Louise Harris

“If people can have a car accident and get brain damage and recover, in my head he had a chance.

To try and understand more, Miss Harris took a diploma looking at the gut and brain. She said she read about links between ADHD and mercury poisoning and decided to have Nathan tested.

Using a hair mineral test, Nathan’s mineral balance and metal toxicity were examined by a lab in America.

The report showed Nathan was low in zinc and had mercury toxicity.

A copy of Nathan Harris's hair mineral test which shows low zinc, and levels of mercury, which his mum Louise thought could be linked to his behaviour. Picture: Louise HarrisA copy of Nathan Harris's hair mineral test which shows low zinc, and levels of mercury, which his mum Louise thought could be linked to his behaviour. Picture: Louise Harris

All humans will accumulate metal in their blood but the World Health Organisation (WHO) said levels of mercury exposure can impact on a child’s memory, attention, language and spacial awareness, symptoms Miss Harris said Nathan has displayed in the past.

Since the test, the family have tried to eat more food that helps the gut such as probiotic yoghurt and smoothies and focus on removing metals from the body to balance his mineral levels and work on his reflexes.

Nathan said: “I feel different, it was hard and now it easy. I enjoy reading, I didn’t before. I find it easier to make friends and kick the ball.”

His brother Leon, 10, added; “It wasn’t easy to play with him, if we were playing with Lego and I knocked one of the pieces off he would get so cross and try to kick and punch me. Now he will ask can I fix it.”


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Norwich Evening News. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Latest from the Norwich Evening News