Your guide to hospital and GP surgery Covid rules from July 19

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, James Paget Hospital and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Pict

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, James Paget Hospital and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital will continue their Covid-19 restrictions after July 19. - Credit: Brittany Woodman/Sonya Duncan

Norfolk and Waveney patients will not see any changes at the region's hospitals, GP surgeries or community services, when restrictions are lifted next week.

Health chiefs said patients had communicated that restrictions remaining in place made them feel safer and it protected those vulnerable as well as staff. 

Here is what you need to know about attending any health services from July 19:

League of Friends shop at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn reopens

The Queen Elizabeth University Hospital - Credit: QEH

Visiting restrictions

Patients in hospitals may have one named person throughout their stay for one hour a day. 


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Visits must be booked through hospital booking systems and require proof of a negative Covid-19 test result, taken no more than 72 hours prior to each visit. 

Where people are unable to visit relatives in person, virtual visits can be arranged.

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Exceptions are made in relation to end-of-life care or those accompanying a child, or a vulnerable patient with learning disabilities, autism or dementia.

At the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, visiting is not permitted on its protected and elective surgical wards.

James Paget Hospital

The James Paget University Hospital - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2019

Masks and social distancing 

All of the region's hospitals and GP practices will continue to enforce masks and social distancing. 

Existing one-way systems will remain in place and staff, patients and visitors must wash or sanitise their hands. 

Extra PPE will be offered in high risk areas and when coming into contact with anyone known or suspected to have Covid.

Ambulances parked up outside the accident and emergency department of the Norfolk and Norwich Univer

Patients are asked to remain visiting A&E on their own

A&E 

All hospitals ask that those needing A&E treatment should attend alone. 

Exceptions to this rule apply to people accompanying a child or vulnerable patient, or to those who are critically ill or receiving end-of-life care.

Pregnant mums have been turned away from the N&N maternity unit because it's been too full. The unit

Restrictions remain in place for maternity services after July 19 - Credit: PA

Maternity

Restrictions will continue with one person able to attend with their pregnant partner to maternity appointments, all ultrasound scans, and in labour.

At the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, partners are able to attend the antenatal ward and postnatal wards between 8.30am and 8.30pm. 

This is between noon and 6pm at the NNUH. 

 Women in labour are excluded from wearing masks, but when attending antenatal or postnatal appointments as out-patients, must also wear a face covering.

A negative test is required. 

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. NNUH

The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital - Credit: Nick Butcher

Children's Wards

Rules in place at the trust's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are that both parents can attend the ward at the NNUH.

At the QEH, both parents are able to visit, one at a time during the 24 hour period but can speak the ward about attending together. 

On children's wards, a patient or carer can stay with a child. 

Appointments 

Outpatient appointments should be attended alone unless accompanying a child or vulnerable patient, or to those who are critically ill or receiving end-of-life care.


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