First aiders' race to help injured man leads to call for mandatory training

Miriam Blyth, inset, has applauded first aiders who helped an injured man outside Debenhams in Norwich on May 6.

Miriam Blyth, inset, has applauded first aiders who helped an injured man outside Debenhams in Norwich on May 6. - Credit: Archant/Miriam Blyth

Fast-thinking city folk who raced to the side of a wounded man in Norwich have been applauded for their vital action.

A man fell in Rampant Horse Street on May 6 outside the former Debenhams store.

And those who witnessed the event immediately stepped into help, employing first aid skills to keep the patient calm and conscious.

Lio Marshall-Nichols rushed across Rampant Horse Street to help the man who had fallen.

Lio Marshall-Nichols rushed across Rampant Horse Street to help the man who had fallen. - Credit: Francis Redwood

Lio Marshall-Nichols, 23, was the first to help the man and said: "I noticed people gesturing in that direction and then noticed a person had fallen so I rushed across the road to go and help him.

"I knelt down beside him and my first aid training kicked in. I observed any injuries.

"Then I kept talking to him to make sure he was still conscious, trying to keep him calm while I asked my friend to call an ambulance.

"I've not had to use my first aid training before but I was just doing what any good person would do.

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"The man seemed thankful for the help he was getting but I was just doing what I could with the training I'd received."

Miriam Blyth, director of Mirbly, in Prince of Wales Road said first aid is: "An incredible skill to have."

Miriam Blyth, director of Mirbly, a health and safety training centre in Prince of Wales Road said first aid is: "An incredible skill to have." - Credit: Miriam Blyth

Miriam Blyth, who is the director of Mirbly, a health and safety training centre in Prince of Wales Road says the importance of first aid training "cannot be understated".

She said: "It's an incredible skill to have - especially with the ambulance services being so stretched recently.

"It should be mandatory across the board, from schools to workplaces. 

"If someone can immediately help a patient it could help their chances considerably depending on what's happened.

"Even if the incident isn't life-threatening one thing we forget is the care for the patient.

"Just calming someone down, helping relieve stress and lowering their heart rate is a very important skill to have."

Matt Jones, who works as a security guard at Marks & Spencer, came to the scene to help the man in Rampant Horse Street.

Matt Jones, who works as a security guard at Marks & Spencer, came to the scene to help the man in Rampant Horse Street. - Credit: Francis Redwood

Matt Jones, who works as a security guard at Marks & Spencer nearby was also quick to help.

He said: "Someone came in asking for first aid assistance as someone had fallen.

"I grabbed a first aid kit and immediately headed out to try and help in any way I could. The main thing was keeping the patient calm.

"I'm pleased I could help in some way - it's why we are first aid trained."