Hair you go – Aimee loses her locks to help seriously-ill children

Aimee Tye, 14, who is a student at the City of Norwich School, had a charity haircut for the Little

Aimee Tye, 14, who is a student at the City of Norwich School, had a charity haircut for the Little Princess Trust. - Credit: Archant

A Norwich schoolgirl's charity haircut has raised more than £500 to help ill children.

Aimee Tye, 14, who is a student at the City of Norwich School, had a charity haircut for the Little

Aimee Tye, 14, who is a student at the City of Norwich School, had a charity haircut for the Little Princess Trust. - Credit: Archant

Aimee Tye, 14, decided to get her hair shorn short in aid of the Little Princess Trust.

The trust is a children's cancer charity and its mission is to supply real-hair wigs to children suffering with cancer, for the duration of their treatment.

Aimee, who is a pupil at City of Norwich School, came up with the idea to help on her own as she knows people who have been affected by the condition.

Her grandfather, Terry Atkins, of West Norwich Lions Club, helped her raise as much as possible.


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The event was at Sheer Elegance hairdressers, Marlingford Road, Easton, following weeks of fundraising.

Organisers have totted up the total, with more than £500 raised and Aimee's hair donated to make a wig.

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Mr Atkins said he was proud of his granddaughter for her efforts.

The Little Princess Trust provides real-hair wigs, free of charge, to boys and girls across the UK and Ireland that have lost their own hair through cancer treatment.

As a result of treatment for cancer, most children will suffer hair loss as a side effect.

A charity spokesman said some boys and girls cope remarkably well but for others this can be very upsetting. The trust also helps children with other conditions which also result in hair loss, the most common being alopecia.

For more details see www.littleprincesses.org.uk

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