Overhanging tree problems for Golden Triangle resident

This overhanging tree has been causing problems for a Golden Triangle resident in Norwich 

This overhanging tree has been causing problems for a Golden Triangle resident in Norwich - Credit: Submitted

While many people have been soaking up the sunshine in their gardens this week, a Norwich woman has been left with no sunlight for hours due to an overgrown neighbouring tree. 

Amie Russell, 37, who lives in the Golden Triangle, has been seeking advice on how to make contact with the owner of a privately-rented property and the legal rights to request a tree to be cut down to a reasonable height. 

She said the tree has grown by 6ft in the three years she has owned her property.

The tree pictured from Amie Russell's back garden in Norwich

The tree pictured from Amie Russell's back garden in Norwich - Credit: Submitted

Miss Russell said: "I literally have no sunlight after 2pm in the garden. I live on a lower level terrace so even drying clothes has been impossible.

"It would seem that there are no rights to protecting your property if the owner does not choose to act, even though it can cause structural damage to neighbouring property, is a safety risk for fire or in heavy winds, and is generally an unpleasant frustration to have no sunlight in a garden." 


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She is confident she will be able to find a resolution as she has been able to track down the owner of the property after being offered advice on an online community message board. 

Miss Russell added: "It may be the case that when the current tenants moved into the property that the tree was already at an unmanageable height, and therefore [it is] not their fault that this is now uncontrollable.

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"It is not practical and dangerous for me to cut a bit off." 

The overhanging tree which has been blocking sunlight at Amie Russell's Norwich property 

The overhanging tree which has been blocking sunlight at Amie Russell's Norwich property - Credit: Submitted

A spokeswoman for Norwich City Council confirmed there is nothing the authority can do, or has responsibility for, as the situation relates to private land.

"The neighbours will have to discuss it between themselves to resolve," she said. 

Citizens Advice states residents should check a tree is not protected by a Tree Preservation Order before cutting it themselves. 

Tress located on boundaries between properties will require legal documents to be checked from when the homes were purchased to establish who is responsible.

Residents can also buy documents from the Land Registry to establish who is the owner. 

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