Secret free treasure hunt takes explorers around the city and beyond

Youngsters search for an infamous geocache in Norwich. 

Youngsters search for an infamous geocache in Norwich. - Credit: Vivien Tucker

A secret city club has shared its hobby with the world and is inviting the public to get involved with its giant treasure hunt.

Geocaching is an outdoor activity in which people use navigational techniques via an app to hide and seek containers.

These containers, named geocaches, are hidden at specific coordinates all over the world.  

There are droves hidden around Norwich - right under city folk's noses.

When players find a geocache they log it on an app before opening it, signing their names and date and replacing it.

Now city cachers want to share their secret and get more people involved.

Stephen Newton, who lives in the city and works in manufacturing, can often be found searching for caches in the fine city.  

Stephen Newton has been geocaching in the fine city for ten years.

Stephen Newton has been geocaching in the fine city for ten years. - Credit: Stephen Newton

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He said: “I started geocaching just over ten years ago, I was introduced to it by one of my colleagues.  

“Geocaching in Norwich means that you end up having a tour of the historic city without meaning to as there are so many hidden all over.” 

A lot of the geocaches will have historical information about the site the player is searching in embedded into the app.  

Karen Woodhouse, who was born and bred in Hellesdon, has been geocaching since 2011.

She says that geocaching gives her a chance to view familiar places with fresh eyes.  

Karen Woodhouse enjoys searching historical places in the city looking for geocaches, particularly handmade ones like this. 

Karen Woodhouse enjoys searching historical places in the city looking for geocaches, particularly handmade ones like this. - Credit: Karen Woodhouse

She said: “I recently completed the Norwich Curiosities caches which was great because I discovered some really quirky things about Norwich.” 

Karen, who is a history teacher, is also the owner of ten caches in the city which she enjoys maintaining.

She said: “Originally we started geocaching as a way to keep our four children interested in longer walks.  

“The hobby has taken us to many places that we wouldn’t otherwise get to explore.” 

Vivien Tucker, who is in her late 70s, has been caching with her family for the last 12 years.  

When you find a geocache, once opened it will have a slip of paper inside which you sign and date. 

When you find a geocache, once opened it will have a slip of paper inside which you sign and date. - Credit: Vivien Tucker

She said: “We often get a call from our son saying that a new cache has gone live and would we like to go with them to get the ‘first to find’. 

“We have been lucky to have gone to so many historical and beautiful places which we wouldn’t have if we weren’t chasing caches.”