Film-maker travels to Ethiopia to visit the Tiger Kids.

The street kids of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia watching How To Train Your Dragon

The street kids of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia watching How To Train Your Dragon - Credit: Archant

Norfolk teacher Cathy Burton runs a centre for the street children of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, who call themselves Tiger Kids. She teaches them English and holds art and music workshops. Colleague and film-maker Jax Burgoyne joined her for the first time to make a film about the Tiger Kids and their lives. Jax has been detailing her time in Africa.

Jax Burgoyne

Jax Burgoyne - Credit: Archant

'Monday was the first day of teaching and the last few days we have been working to get the classroom ready for teaching by preparing resources and getting more contacts and help – it's wonderful,' she said.

'There's King, a man who is in Addis for a week, from somewhere in north Ethiopia. I started chatting to him on the bus after we had bought some small plastic chairs from the main market and he's teaching the kids for a bit.

'The manager of a local restaurant will be teaching a drama lesson.

'We had treats of biscuits, crisps and milk for the Tiger Kids, but we're going healthy and will be cooking them some pasta with vegetables. It was a two-hour session this time, and an easy introduction for them – wash hands, register, food and we watched How to Train Your Dragon, which they loved even though their English is very limited.

Norfolk teacher Cathy Burton, who runs a centre for the street kids of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, with

Norfolk teacher Cathy Burton, who runs a centre for the street kids of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, with King who is from North Ethiopia and will be teaching the children. - Credit: Archant


You may also want to watch:


'Then we explained to them idea of doing a film, got their consent, and gave them all hats which were just a small part of the donations we received.'

Are you doing anything for charity? Email rebecca.murphy@archant.co.uk

Most Read

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter