‘What’s the point of algebra?’ - scientist, dietician and reporter show pupils why their studies matter

Reporter Martin George explains the role of a journalist to pupils at Magdalen Gates Primary School,

Reporter Martin George explains the role of a journalist to pupils at Magdalen Gates Primary School, Norwich.Photo by Simon Finlay. - Credit: Archant Norfolk

A series of talks from a scientist, dietician, caterer and even an Evening News reporter have helped children at a primary school see how what they study today could come in useful in the future.

Reporter Martin George explains the role of a journalist to pupils at Magdalen Gates Primary School,

Reporter Martin George explains the role of a journalist to pupils at Magdalen Gates Primary School, Norwich.Photo by Simon Finlay. - Credit: Archant Norfolk

The 'I Love My Job' assemblies for the 195 pupils at Magdalen Gates Primary School in Bull Close Road, Norwich, have brought in people who work in a range of occupations to show pupils how they use skills that they learned when they were at school.

The series started in January, and the Monday morning meetings have included one from a caterer who works on Greater Anglia trains between Norwich and London, who told pupils about the links between the maths he learned when he was younger and his job today.

Other talks have come from an NHS dietician and a scientist from British Sugar, and this week Martin George, education correspondent for this newspaper, visited the school to talk about the life of a reporter.

When asked what skills they thought a reporter might need, pupils suggested good spelling, being able to listen to people, being able to read, and being able to explain things to other people.


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Acting headteacher Paul Henman said: 'The main objective was to try to make the link between what the children are doing at school and what they may well do as a job when they leave school.

'It's going really well. I think every visitor who has come in has worked really hard to make that link for the children, so they can see that if you work hard writing you could become a journalist in the future, or if you understand maths and work hard you could become a scientist.'

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He added: 'We have called it 'I Love My Job' assemblies because we want people to come in and talk passionately about their jobs because you go get a lot of people who talk negatively about their job, but everyone who has come in has been really passionate.'

He said the response to the assemblies from the children had been very positive, with parents telling him they talked about what they had heard when they came home.

The next talk is due to come from a member of the probation service.

Is your school doing something unusual? Email martin.george@archant.co.uk

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