Search

Norwich Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 26°C

min temp: 16°C

City school raising the baa in animal husbandry with resident rams

PUBLISHED: 15:13 18 June 2019 | UPDATED: 09:39 19 June 2019

Pupils at Norwich High School for Girls feeding their new school mates, some Wensleydale sheep. From left, Ottilie Vinters, Chloe Tabard, Inez Duman, Emma Cossey, Hannah Haistead, headmistress Kirsty von Malaisé (back), and Tanvi Kare. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Pupils at Norwich High School for Girls feeding their new school mates, some Wensleydale sheep. From left, Ottilie Vinters, Chloe Tabard, Inez Duman, Emma Cossey, Hannah Haistead, headmistress Kirsty von Malaisé (back), and Tanvi Kare. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Copyright: Archant 2019

A city school is raising the baa in animal care education.

Hannah Haistead, left, and Inez Duman, feed one of their new schoolmates at Norwich High School for Girls, some Wensleydale sheep. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYHannah Haistead, left, and Inez Duman, feed one of their new schoolmates at Norwich High School for Girls, some Wensleydale sheep. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Four sheep have taken up residence at Norwich High School for Girls for the summer to further the students' "ed-ewe-cation" in agriculture and animal husbandry.

The rams, named Tiny Tim, Radar, Zak and Pukki (named by students after Norwich City's Finnish striker), are living in the school's Dingley Dell field, next to its heritage orchard, for the summer term.

Feeding and petting drop-in sessions are taking place each day with talks on farming and veterinary science also available for students to sign up to.

The idea came following a conversation between Norwich High School for Girls headmistress Kirsty von Malaisé and parent and farmer Bob Purser at last year's Royal Norfolk Show, after which Mr Purser agreed to loan the school some of his Wensleydale sheep for a term.

Emma Cossey feeds the Wensleydale sheep at Norwich High School for Girls. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYEmma Cossey feeds the Wensleydale sheep at Norwich High School for Girls. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

And the association is due to come full circle at this year's Royal Norfolk Show, with four Norwich High School students aged five to 17 being taught how to handle sheep in order to show the foursome at the event next week.

Mrs von Malaisé said that, given the prominence of agricultural life and work in Norfolk, it felt pertinent to give the students a chance to experience it.

She said: "There is an extraordinary number of aspiring vets at Norwich High - the sheep provide an opportunity to teach our girls about veterinary science and animal husbandry.

"We have, for example, held a session where the girls were taught to tip the sheep in order to inspect what lies beneath: this was harder than expected.

Pupils at Norwich High School for Girls feeding their new school mates, some Wensleydale sheep. From left, Ottilie Vinters, Chloe Tabard, Inez Duman, Emma Cossey, Hannah Haistead, and Tanvi Kare. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYPupils at Norwich High School for Girls feeding their new school mates, some Wensleydale sheep. From left, Ottilie Vinters, Chloe Tabard, Inez Duman, Emma Cossey, Hannah Haistead, and Tanvi Kare. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

"In addition, the animals provide development opportunities for girls who lead on feeding sessions and teach younger girls what they know. Norwich High alumnae have even returned to the school, excited to lead on the vet sessions with the Senior School girls."

The rams are not the first animals which Norwich High School has welcomed this year - Casper the school dog joined the school earlier in the academic year and has proved very popular.

Animal contact has reportedly had a positive impact on the wellbeing of students and staff.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Norwich Evening News

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists