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Hethersett’s young and old imagine life in 100 years

PUBLISHED: 10:44 25 June 2012

Time capsule being buried at Hethersett Hall Care Home containing contemporary contents and pictures and stories  from local schoolchildren predicting what the world will be like in 2112. Winning schoolchildren Zain Hussan, centre and left Katie Banfield and right Emily Anderson with centenarian resident Mary Ransley.Photo: Steve Adams

Time capsule being buried at Hethersett Hall Care Home containing contemporary contents and pictures and stories from local schoolchildren predicting what the world will be like in 2112. Winning schoolchildren Zain Hussan, centre and left Katie Banfield and right Emily Anderson with centenarian resident Mary Ransley.Photo: Steve Adams

Young and old joined together yesterday as they buried a time capsule with iconic objects from this century, and a look forward to life in 100 years.

Items in the capsule ranged from a mobile phone, to ideas from Hethersett Woodside Infant and Nursery School about what they thought life would be like in 2112.

Predictions ranged from aliens on skateboards and hovercrafts dominating Norwich’s streets, to living in triangular houses.

The best three of the futuristic drawings were chosen by residents of the Hethersett Hall care home, and buried in the time capsule at the centre on Norwich Road.

One of the winners, seven-year-old Emily Anderson said: “I think that aliens are going to be living in Hethersett in 100 years time but I don’t think they will be scary, but really friendly.

“I would be 107 then, so I don’t think I’ll be alive to see it.”

Katie Banfield, also seven, from Hethersett, says she imagines living in a house with a triangular bottom and a square top.

The care home’s oldest occupant, 100-year-old Mary Ransley, helped the children cover the capsule once in the ground.

She said it: “Wouldn’t it be wonderful to be living 100-years again, but I certainly won’t be around in another 100 years to see what it’s like.”

Sara Johnston, deputy head at Woodside school, said: “Being part of the community is very important and that’s why it’s so wonderful for the children to be here and a part of the project.

It’s also lovely to tie it in with the Queen’s Jubilee “

10-year-old Zain Hassan imagined hovercrafts and aliens in his futuristic world.

He said: “I just hope there is enough around for everybody to be happy in 100-years time.”

His father, Aviva worker Ameer Hassan, 38, said: “It’s great to get the children’s imagination going and to think about the future. I wonder if theyt put an iPhone in the box.”

Got a quirky story? Contact Rosa McMahon: 01603 772495 or rosa.mcmahon@archant.co.uk


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