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Exclusive: how Norwich's schools have done in the primary school tables

Trowse Primary staff and pupils have reason to celebrate after being named among the best schools in England in English and maths tests at age 11.

Trowse Primary staff and pupils have reason to celebrate after being named among the best schools in England in English and maths tests at age 11.

Archant © 2006

Schools in and around Norwich are once more among the very best - and the very worst - in England.

The latest primary school league tables, published this morning, show the huge differences in performance in the key subjects of English and maths between schools that are relatively close together.

Larkman Primary on Clarkson Road in Norwich is named as the 81st worst in England for performance in English and maths, with just 36pc of 11-year-olds getting the target level four in both subjects in May’s standard assessment tests (Sats).

The same school is 51st worst for the amount of value it adds to students between the ages of seven and 11 - the contextual value-added measure.

But St Peter’s Primary at Easton, near Norwich, is leading the way locally after being listed as the 18th most improved school in England, having improved its average point score per pupil from 25.9 to 30.4.

Although a significant amount of data is not available because 73 of Norfolk’s key stage two schools boycotted the Sats in May, questions will be asked about performance in the county.

Norfolk slumped from 111th of the 152 local authorities in 2009 to 135th this year, with the percentage of 11-year-olds getting the target level four in English dropping from 78pc to 74pc and the percentage getting at least level four in maths dropping from 76pc to 75pc.

Alison Thomas, Norfolk County Council’s cabinet member for children’s services, said: “It is extremely disappointing that we don’t have any meaningful data for key stage two this year. We made clear our opposition to the test boycott, which we felt was unfair on the young people who had been expecting to sit the tests.

“It also means we do not have important data to help us assess what is happening in our schools. Previous results suggest that the schools that did boycott would have brought our overall results up.

“Despite this we are pleased that the teacher assessments took place and reflect the improvements that we know have taken place in maths. However, these assessments need greater moderation and challenge to be reliable and we would welcome this as part of any review into the future assessment process.

“We are supportive of having a system that gives reliable information to parents, schools and most importantly to the children themselves.”

Among the best and worst performances by schools are:

Banham Primary - 135th best in England after all of its 11-year-olds got the target level four in English and maths

Trowse Primary - 182nd best after all of its 11-year-olds got level four in English and maths

Greenacre Primary and Nursery at Great Yarmouth - 6th worst in England after 22pc got level four or better in English and maths

Cawston Primary, near Aylsham - 30th worst, with 29pc getting level four in English and maths

Peterhouse Primary, Great Yarmouth - 36th worst, with 30pc getting level four in English and maths

Larkman Primary, Clarkson Road, Norwich - 81st worst, with 36pc getting level four in English and maths

Horsford Junior - 31st worst in England for the amount of value it adds to children between seven and 11

Larkman Primary - 51st worst for the amount of value it adds to children between seven and 11

St Michael’s Junior, Astley Road, Bowthorpe - 125th worst for the amount of value it adds to children between seven and 11

St Peter’s Primary, Easton - 18th most improved in England, with the average point score per pupil rising from 25.9 in 2007 to 30.4 in 2010

Lionwood Junior, Wolfe Road, Norwich - 89th most improved, with the average point score per pupil rising from 24.3 in 2007 to 27.4 in 2010

Stoke Holy Cross Primary - 152nd most improved, with the average point score per pupil rising from 27.8 in 2007 to 30.4 in 2010

Erpingham Primary, near Aylsham - joint 164th worst for persistent absence, with 7.7pc of its pupils missing at least 20pc of their learning

Tuckswood Primary, Norwich - joint 164th worst for persistent absence, with 7.7pc of its pupils missing at least 20pc of their learning.

Norfolk made another big improvement in the percentage of pupils classed as persistent absentees - those missing at least one day of schooling each week.

This year, the figure fell to 1.6pc (58th best in England) - down from 2.2pc in 2009 (79th) and 2.5pc in 2008.

Schools minister Nick Gibb said: “We want every child, at every school, to fulfil their potential. Currently half of all 10- and 11-year-old boys who qualify for free school meals are being let down by our education system.

“It is unacceptable that after seven years of primary school these children are not at the standard in English and maths that they need to flourish at secondary school.

“It’s why we are putting such an emphasis on improving pupils’ reading ability in the first years of primary school, with a focus on phonics.

“It’s why we are prioritising raising standards of behaviour in schools and supporting teachers and head teachers to instil a zero tolerance approach to poor behaviour in class.

“And it’s why we are introducing new fair but firm floor standards to identify under-performing schools – but schools with challenging intakes won’t be classified as under-performing if their pupils progress well. We will recognise the unique circumstances of every school.”

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