Guilty murder verdict for man who stabbed neighbour 17 times

Jamie Crosbie who has been found guilty of the murder of Dean Allsop

Jamie Crosbie who has been found guilty of the murder of Dean Allsop - Credit: Norfolk Constabulary

A man has been found guilty of the murder of a neighbour in which he used knives and a saw to stab to death a father-of-three in a row over motorbike noise.

Jamie Crosbie, 48, had been on trial at Norwich Crown Court having denied the murder of Dean Allsop in Primrose Crescent, Thorpe St Andrew on April 14 last year.

Murder victim Dean Allsop pictured on a motorbike

James Crosbie has appeared in court charged with murder of Dean Allsop, pictured. - Credit: Facebook

The court heard the 41-year-old was stabbed 17 times by Crosbie after he became angry at the noise from a motorbike belonging to Mr Allsop’s son Mikey.

A jury of eight men and four women took almost 12 and a quarter hours to find Crosbie guilty of murder.

Crosbie, who wore a blue T-shirt in the dock showed no emotion while there were gasps of "yes" from Mr Allsop's family and friends in the packed public gallery.

Jamie Crosbie (right) being arrested for the murder of Dean Allsop

Jamie Crosbie (right) being arrested for the murder of Dean Allsop - Credit: Norfolk Constabulary

In a statement released after the verdicts in the case, Mr Allsop's partner Louise Newell said: "I cannot put into words how this has affected our whole family.

"My children have lost their hero and I have lost my chosen person - the person I chose to spend my life with.

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"My best friend, soulmate, my first love.

"Our lives will never be the same without Dean, but we will continue to keep his memory alive."

The jury also found Crosbie not guilty of the attempted murders of Miss Newell and of her neighbour Kerryn Kray but guilty of wounding with intent in relation to both.

Judge Anthony Bate adjourned sentence in the case until September 21.

Police forensic officers at the scene of a fatal stabbing and three other people injured at Primrose

Police forensic officers at the scene of a fatal stabbing at Primrose Crescent in Thorpe St Andrew. - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

The trial, which started on July 18 and has lasted more than two weeks, has heard Crosbie had allowed himself to become annoyed at the noise of motorbike engines being ridden by Mr Allsop and his teenage son.

The bikes were turned off at the time but Crosbie "appeared at a window in his house" and stuck up his middle finger to Mr Allsop, who he had previously attacked following a fall-out in 2018.

Andrew Jackson, prosecuting, said Crosbie, who has since been diagnosed with a "delusional disorder', came to the front door and was, said Mr Jackson, "plainly angry".

A police officer covers one of two motorbikes at the scene of a fatal stabbing and three other peopl

A police officer covers one of two motorbikes at the scene of a fatal stabbing and three other people injured at Primrose Crescent in Thorpe St Andrew. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

He shouted at Mr Allsop and said he could not hear his TV.

And after recognising Mr Allsop, who had his crash helmet on at the time, Crosbie said "come here, come here and get me".

Mr Allsop did not respond but took out his phone and dialled 999, having previously been attacked by Crosbie

A forensics van and police car put a cordon up on Primrose Crescent.

A forensics van and police car put a cordon up on Primrose Crescent. - Credit: Peter Walsh

Crosbie, of Primrose Crescent, came out with a saw in one hand and a kitchen knife in the other and began to chase Mr Allsop.

Seeing his father being chased Mikey ran back to his home to get a knife and ran back to the garage area.

Mikey, son of Dean Allsop, taking part in a ride out in memory of his father.

Mikey, son of Dean Allsop, taking part in a ride out in memory of his father. - Credit: Submitted

Mr Jackson said: "By the time he got back his father had been stabbed."

He said Mikey could see "a lot of blood" with the defendant standing next to his father.

The victim's son hit Crosbie with his knife before running back home to get his mother, Miss Newell.

Dean Allsop, left, pictured with partner Louise Newell.

Dean Allsop, left, pictured with partner Louise Newell. Picture supplied by Norfolk Constabulary. - Credit: Norfolk Constabulary

She ran to the scene and got there as Crosbie had gone to re-arm himself with another knife as he had broken one of them in the attack.

Mr Jackson said: "The only thing she could see was her partner lying in a pool of blood."

She found him unresponsive and began to scream.

Crosbie returned, leaned over Mr Allsop's body, and despite Miss Newell saying "please no", he then "began to stab Dean Allsop again".

Mr Jackson said: "He stabbed him in his neck and upper back."

Having done that Mr Jackson said Crosbie then started stabbing Miss Newell.

A police forensic officer at the murder victim's home in Primrose Crescent. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Forensics officers at Dean Allsop's home where floral tributes were left - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Neighbour Kerryn Kray came to help having heard Miss Newell's screams but was also attacked by Crosbie.

Other neighbours called police, who had initially been contacted by Mr Allsop.

At 8.18pm Mr Allsop was pronounced dead.

The fatal injuries were two stab wounds to his chest which penetrated his right lung and heart, resulting in "massive and fatal bleeding".

At 8.20pm Crosbie was arrested on suspicion of murder. It was then, he said: "That makes me happy."

Flowers left at the murder victim's home in Primrose Crescent. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Some of the floral tributes left at Dean Allsop's home - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Elizabeth Marsh QC, defending Crosbie, had tried to convince the jury that his extreme burst of violent anger" had been a result of the "manifestation of his delusional disorder" and urged the jury not to find him guilty of murder.

But Mr Jackson said it was not his disorder which was at play that night but "violent anger" which left him "hell bent" on killing Mr Allsop.

Speaking after the case, senior investigating officer Detective Chief Inspector Phill Gray, from the Norfolk and Suffolk Major Investigation Team, said: “This was a cold-blooded attack by a man intent on causing extreme harm to others.

DCI Phill Gray at Blaydon Bridge in Thetford. Picture: Danielle Booden

DCI Phill Gray - Credit: Danielle Booden, Archant Norfolk

"Dean suffered 17 stab wounds to his body, some of which were inflicted when he was lying face-down and motionless.  

"Crosbie’s savage attack didn’t stop there; he stabbed two people who had come to help Dean, one suffering an arterial bleed to her neck.

“Crosbie is an extremely violent man who has no place in society, and we welcome the jury’s verdict today.

"The incident that fatal night has striking similarities to a previous incident in 2018 where he threatened Dean with a knife and hammer.

“Above all, our thoughts remain with Dean’s family and friends who continue to grieve his loss.

"It’s seeking answers and the truth for families which drives us to carry out thorough investigations and get positive results like the one today.

"In reality we know it offers little comfort as it doesn’t change what’s happened, but it does take a dangerous man off the streets and offers some justice to the family and friends left behind.”

'An amazing father'

Thorpe St Andrew murder victim Dean Allsop pictured holding a fish

Dean Allsop who was stabbed to death in Thorpe St Andrew. - Credit: Facebook

Dean Allsop, a father-of-three, lived at Primrose Crescent, Thorpe St Andrew with his partner Louise Newell and was well liked by friends and neighbours.

The roadworker had a love of motorbikes which he shared with his older children, including Mikey.

The 41-year-old was described in court by prosecutor Andrew Jackson as a "plainly devoted family man".

Dean Allsop who was murdered by Jamie Crosbie

Dean Allsop who was murdered by Jamie Crosbie - Credit: Norfolk Constabulary

After his death, in April last year, Miss Newell said: "Dean was my heartbeat, my soulmate, my best friend and the love of my life.

"He was an amazing father to Millie, Mikey and Jacob and he has been cruelly taken away from us.

"Our lives have been destroyed and our family will never be the same again."

While his mother Jill, who lives in Lincolnshire, said: "We have lost a diamond and I'm truly heartbroken".

Profile of a murderer

Jamie Crosbie (right) being arrested for the murder of Dean Allsop

Jamie Crosbie (right) being arrested for the murder of Dean Allsop - Credit: Norfolk Constabulary

The killer lived something of an isolated life and had been thought odd by neighbours who had seen him "standing on the roof sweeping off the moss".

Crosbie, who was a single man, did not work and had previously expressed delusional beliefs about having been cloned as a baby.

He also previously made references to time machines and wanting to hurt Dean Allsop who he had previously chased with a saw and a knife after he put rubbish in his bin in 2018.

The court heard Crosbie's family had previously raised concerns that his mental condition had deteriorated and he had become increasingly isolated.

Crosbie, who was sensitive to noise, had been previously detained for mental health reasons after he threw a hammer at Mr Allsop and told staff about delusions involving time machines, voices and conspiracies involving Google Earth.

But it was not until after his arrest for the murder of Mr Allsop last year that he finally acknowledged he was mentally unwell.