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Controversy hits Yarmouth performing arts centre

PUBLISHED: 08:55 07 April 2010 | UPDATED: 09:27 02 July 2010

Rick Wakeman and Dave Greeenslade open the new performing arts centre at Yarmouth college in February. Student band, 'Eight' perform at the opening.

Rick Wakeman and Dave Greeenslade open the new performing arts centre at Yarmouth college in February. Student band, 'Eight' perform at the opening.

Anthony Carroll

A new performing arts centre at Great Yarmouth College could end up a £2m white elephant, if councillors reject an application to hold musical events and plays there.

A new performing arts centre at Great Yarmouth College could end up a £2m white elephant, if councillors reject an application to hold musical events and plays there.

On Friday the college will find out if its School of Creative Arts and Technologies will be granted a premises licence to hold public events.

However, college bosses could see their ambitious plans to create a regional centre of arts excellence shot down in flames after complaints from neighbouring residents about noisy music.

The college's premises licence application is asking the council to give it the green light to perform plays, show films and have live music and dancing from between 2pm to 10.30pm seven days a week.

Since the centre opened in September, families have said that they can hear “thumping music” from the centre as students perform in sound proofed studios.

Because of the noise, six people in Anchor Court have sent in a petition and letter of objection to the Yarmouth Borough Council licensing committee demanding that the new centre be properly sound proofed before any licence is granted.

Their complaints have been taken up by borough councillor for the Southtown and Cobholm ward Penny Linden.

On Friday the licensing sub committee will have three options - approval, refusal or to exclude any of the licensable activities.

Licensing officers have not made any recommendations for councillors to follow.

The college has said it will continue to monitor noise levels as part of risk assessments.


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