Trio to take on record-breaking 2,800 mile row across the Pacific Ocean

From left to right: Cutu Serruys, Angus Duthie and Luca Feser are taking on the Pacific ocean to raise money for charity.

From left to right: Cutu Serruys, Angus Duthie and Luca Feser are taking on the Pacific ocean to raise money for charity. - Credit: Luca Feser

Three best friends will take on the deepest ocean on the planet as they attempt to row round-the-clock for 40 days straight.

Luca Feser, Angus Duthie and Cutu Serruys will make an exhausting 2,800 mile journey - through two time zones - from the Californian coast to Hawaii in June 2023. 

Their adventure of a lifetime sees them take on the first Pacific Challenge, a new 4,5000km trek with up to 20 teams competing.

The Norwich-based friends have begun training for the event in which they will row in two-hour shifts across treacherous waves and currents. 

They will set off from Monteray Bay in California, arriving just over a month later in Nawiliwili Harbor in Hawaii.

An example of the type of boat the childhood friends will be using to row the Pacific Ocean.

An example of the type of boat the childhood friends will be using to row the Pacific Ocean. - Credit: Atlantic Campaigns

Mr Feser, 27, who lives in Pottergate, said: "We wanted to do something coming out of lockdown that was bigger than ourselves. 

"Originally it was going to be a lot smaller but when we found the Pacific row - which has only ever been completed by 80 people - the challenge really attracted us to it."

Most Read

The friends - who met aged 11 at the City of Norwich School - will be sharing a boat kitted out with sleeping quarters and a GPS tracker to raise money for Ocean Cleanup.

From left to right: Cutu Serruys, Angus Duthie and Luca Feser are taking on the Pacific ocean to raise money for charity.

From left to right: Cutu Serruys, Angus Duthie and Luca Feser are taking on the Pacific ocean to raise money for charity. - Credit: Luca Feser

Mr Feser added: "We will sleep in cramped quarters, cross two time zones and experience all the weather the Pacific Ocean has to throw at us.

"We only decided to take on this challenge back in December. I think at the moment we're all still excited as opposed to fearful."

The team are currently training which Norwich Rowing Club twice a week and will be ramping up their schedule to daily as the race draws closer.

The trio are raising money for charity, The Ocean Cleanup, who are working to clear up the seas.

The trio are raising money for charity, The Ocean Cleanup, who are working to clear up the seas. - Credit: Ocean Cleanup

Mr Feser said: "We'll record certain rubbish patches along our route and it will cross reference back to the charity we are rowing for - Ocean Cleanup - and help them save time trying to track down the garbage hot spots."

To give the public just a glimpse of what they're in for, the trio will be putting on a 12-hour exhibition at Chapelfield Gardens on May 7 between 10am and 10pm.

Luca said: "We want to raise as much money and awareness as possible about what we're trying to achieve."

About the challenge

The Pacific row challenge has been taken on many times over the decades. 

The first person to row the Pacific was Patrick Quesnel in 1976 who rowed from Washington State to Hawaii. 

Since then just 80 people in 31 boats have made the crossing - according to Atlantic Campaigns. 


Of the 31 crews to have completed the voyage, 10 were all female, 18 all male and just three were mixed gender.

The fastest female team to row this route was Ocean Sheroes who completed the row in 35 days, 17 hours and 32 minutes in 2021.

The average crossing time for all crew sizes is 62 days.

The challenge is not without its danger - as 75pc of the world’s volcanos are situated in the Pacific Ocean basin.