Abandoned cars re-emerge as water recedes on flood-hit road

Two cars that had to be abandoned following flooding on Green Lane at Thorpe End.

Two cars that had to be abandoned following flooding on Green Lane at Thorpe End. - Credit: Victoria Pertusa

This is the aftermath of flooding which hit a rural route on the outskirts of Norwich in recent days.

As water levels begin to fall in affected areas across the region, the damage to two cars that had to be abandoned on Green Lane, in Thorpe End, can be seen.

The vehicles, a dark grey Toyota Hybrid and a red Ford Focus have been under the railway bridge since before Christmas, following two rescues in as many days.

Whitney McKernan-Sullivan and her two sons were rescued by a stranger after she became stranded in high flood water returning home from a Christmas shopping on December 23.

Less than 24 hours later eye witnesses watched two people being pulled from a submerged car by a firefighter.  

Alex Emmerson, who witnessed the incident, said: "The firefighter was up to his neck in freezing cold water. I saw him start to scream to other firefighters, 'get you gear on'. He then called, 'are you alive?'

"I felt awful and was praying they were okay. The firefighter broke the window of the car and started pulling out this lady." 


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The road currently remains closed in both directions towards the railway bridge due to the water levels.

The road remains close at both ends near the railway bridge of Green Lane, in Thorpe End.

The road remains close at both ends near the railway bridge of Green Lane, in Thorpe End. - Credit: Victoria Pertusa

But, head two miles up the road and the impact of flood water has been less severe, something equestrian centre owner Steve Small says he is grateful about.

Steve Small, of Great Oak Equestrian, said the business has been lucky during the recent heavy rain.

Steve Small, of Great Oak Equestrian, said the business has been lucky during the recent heavy rain. - Credit: Victoria Pertusa

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Mr Small, who owns Great Oak Equestrian Centre, in Witton Lane, said he felt he was helped by the fact the centre used to be a former fruit farm and has good drainage systems.

The centre was badly affected by flood water last November, requiring pumps to remove water that had entered the stables and lost two washing machines in the process.

The heavy rain seen across Norfolk on Christmas Eve made moving a temporary portable cabin more difficult, but the site has otherwise been unaffected.

Mr Small said: "You go out and you see what's around you, the difference in a two mile radius.

"We have been really lucky. For us it has not been that bad."


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