Pick n mix dried flower florist opens in city centre

Jessica Fellas with a selection of her home-grown dried flowers in her florist shop Jipola at St Aug

Jessica Fellas with a selection of her home-grown dried flowers in her florist shop Jipola at St Augustines Street. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

A new florist is seeing blooms flying off the shelves courtesy of pick n mix dried flower arrangements and bespoke festive wreaths. 

Jessica Fellas first trained as a florist eight years ago while living in Hong Kong but has now opened her first shop closer to home. 

The 37-year-old first rose in popularity overseas thanks to her headdresses for events which could be reworn throughout the season. 

Jessica Fellas with a selection of her home-grown dried flowers in her florist shop Jipola at St Aug

Jessica Fellas with a selection of her home-grown dried flowers in her florist shop Jipola at St Augustines Street. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

She said: "I studied photography so lost the thread of floristry a little bit - but it's something I always wanted to come back to. 

"When I came back to the UK I wanted to continue working with flowers but in a more creative way than the traditional bouquets and arrangements."

Miss Fellas has a garden in Ringland where she grows her flowers and then dries them - which is what makes her work unique. 

She explained: "I just love how dried flowers capture a moment in time. They retain their colour and their scent but they're often a more unusual texture - and they seem to be a bit of a trend at the moment.

Jessica Fellas with a couple of her home-grown dried flower wreaths in her florist shop Jipola at St

Jessica Fellas with a couple of her home-grown dried flower wreaths in her florist shop Jipola at St Augustines Street. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Most Read

"I don't want my shop to be a traditional florist which uses floristry foam and wire - I don't want to follow all the rules you get taught. I'm much more lead by the texture and the feel of what I'm trying to create instead of the regimented: 'You must have three of these stems, five of those'. 

"You have to learn the rules to break them - but I want to try and be more sustainable which is why I use my methods."

Miss Fellas opened her shop, Jipola, a few weeks ago in St Augustines Street and has seen her work flying off the shelves and workshops booked up. 

Jipola dried flower florist in St Augustines Street. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Jipola dried flower florist in St Augustines Street. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

"We've got a pick n mix dried flower wall where you pay per stem and create your own arrangement," she added. 

"We have people who bring in their own vases and I help them create arrangements to go in them. That's been really popular but so have the wreaths I've been making for Christmas - each are unique and you can pack a lot of them away to use again next year," she said. 

Some of the home-grown dried flowers in Jessica Fellas' florist shop Jipola at St Augustines Street.

Some of the home-grown dried flowers in Jessica Fellas' florist shop Jipola at St Augustines Street. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Jessica's top tips on drying your own flowers

Miss Fellas said: "It's actually really easy to dry your own flowers. 

"The main thing is to pick stems which aren't really think and hold absolutely loads of water otherwise it doesn't work as well.

"The next tip would be to dry flowers in a dark, dry space. It has to be dark for the leaves to retain their colours and dry so that they don't get damp. 

"You also want a place which isn't too warm and has decent ventilation. A lot of people try to use airing cupboards but if they have boilers in it can be too warm - a garden shed is perfect. 

"Lastly remember you don't have to dry everything upside down - pampas grass for example can be dried just standing in a vase."




Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter