Blue Peter time capsule will be on display in Norwich this weekend

Richard Bacon and Katy Hill with the Blue Peter's Millennium Time Capsule before it was buried

Richard Bacon and Katy Hill with the Blue Peter's Millennium Time Capsule before it was buried - Credit: Archant

Blue Peter fans will be able to take a look inside the famous capsule which was dug up by accident 33 years early.

The contents of Blue Peter's Millennium Time Capsule.

The contents of Blue Peter's Millennium Time Capsule. - Credit: Archant

The Millenium Time Capsule was buried by presenters Katy Hill and Richard Bacon in June 1998 beneath the Millenium Dome in Greenwich.

The capsule contains a snapshot of pre-2000 life at the time including a picture of Princess Diana, rollerskates and teletubbies.

But in February 2017 it was dug up by construction workers by accident - 33 years earlier than its 2050 excavation date.

Since then it has remained in a secret location but has now embarked on a UK tour including BBC Norfolk in The Forum, Norwich.

A Blue Peter badge. Picture: ARCHANT LIBRARY

A Blue Peter badge. Picture: ARCHANT LIBRARY - Credit: Archant


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The tour celebrate the famous children's show's 60th anniversary and after arriving on July 28 is here until this Sunday August 5.

It will also be at BBC Glasgow and BBC Media City, Salford and will then be sealed and stored in The National Archives until it will be seen by a new generation in 2050.

READ MORE: Pimm's, Gin and Prosecco Festival coming to Norwich this weekendBlue Peter editor Ewan Vinnicombe said: 'I can remember the 1998 Millennium Time Capsule getting buried when I was in my first year working at BBC Children's.

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'Time certainly flies and now, 20 years later, as the show's editor I am deciding the future of one of the most iconic parts of the programme.

'Although unexpected, it is brilliant that we can let families across the UK see the contents of the 1998 time capsule earlier than planned before it is sealed away until 2050 at The National Archives.'

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