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'He was a salt-of-the-earth type': Bin lorry drivers' final farewell to respected colleague

PUBLISHED: 08:25 18 April 2019 | UPDATED: 11:48 18 April 2019

Jonathan Lincoln. Picture: Bridget Warrington

Jonathan Lincoln. Picture: Bridget Warrington

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A motorcade of dustcarts accompanied a much-loved and well-respected bin man on his last journey through the streets of Norwich.

The funeral cortege for binman John Lincoln, which includes ten bin lorries, making their way to Earlham Cemetery. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYThe funeral cortege for binman John Lincoln, which includes ten bin lorries, making their way to Earlham Cemetery. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Jonathan Lincoln died aged 53 on March 20 at Priscilla Bacon 
Lodge after losing his battle with cancer.

As his funeral procession made its way through Norwich towards Earlham Crematorium, it was followed by a fleet of 10 dustcarts driven by his colleagues as a mark of respect to the popular man, who friends and family described as “lovely”.

One of four siblings, Mr Lincoln was born and raised in Norwich and had worked as a bin man for 15 years before he was forced to retire due to his health.

Bridget Warrington, Mr Lincoln's sister, said her brother was “a great uncle” to her children.

Binman John Lincoln's funeral at Earlham Cemetery. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYBinman John Lincoln's funeral at Earlham Cemetery. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

She said: “He was funny, he had a really good sense of humour and was a real salt-of-the-earth type.

“He was a lovely man and a great uncle. He had a wicked temper, but not in a nasty way, 
and he helped anyone if he 
could.”

She said her brother enjoyed his job. “[Jonathan] was very proud of being a bin man,” she said. “I think he just loved being with people. He had always done outside work, and being with the boys. He was very proud of being part of something.”

She added her brother's colleagues were “a big part” of his life and many of them visited him after he left work and while he was being treated for cancer.

A bin lorry floral tribute is cartied into the funeral for binman John Lincoln at Earlham Cemetery. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYA bin lorry floral tribute is cartied into the funeral for binman John Lincoln at Earlham Cemetery. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

“He'd be over the moon with the dustcarts. He joked that he would have liked to have had a live wake, so he would have loved it and relished in it.

“He would have absolutely loved it and he would have been on board if it was for anyone else.”

Tom Tilsey, a Biffa employee who worked with Mr Lincoln, said he remembered his first day with him. He said: “He touched all our hearts. He was such a lovely gentleman and would do anything for anyone.

“He treated us like part of his family.”

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