Work to repair city sinkhole continues as road remains closed

Work underway to investigate the cause of the Beaconsfield Road in Norwich.

Work underway to investigate the cause of the Beaconsfield Road in Norwich. - Credit: Simon Parkin

Diversion signs remain in place after a sinkhole opened up on a Norwich residential street last week. 

Beaconsfield Road was closed after the sinkhole appeared on Wednesday evening with residents having to take action to stop traffic passing before the county council was on scene. 

Anglian Water now has contractors on-site as work continues to fix the gaping hole. 

The sinkhole on Beaconsfield Road in Norwich.

The sinkhole on Beaconsfield Road in Norwich. - Credit: Simon Parkin

A spokesman for Norfolk County Council said: "Work has been under way to investigate the area of subsidence on Beaconsfield Road in Norwich.

"Anglian Water is on site to carry out repairs, and the fully signed diversion route for vehicles will remain in place until the road can be reopened.”

Vehicles have been able to access Beaconsfield Road via Spencer Street until the work is finished and the road can be fully reopened.


You may also want to watch:


The terrace house-lined road, which runs from Sprowston Road to Silver Road, was partially closed between Spencer Street and Sprowston Road on Thursday morning.

Beaconsfield Road in Norwich was closed after a sinkhole opened up.

Beaconsfield Road in Norwich was closed after a sinkhole opened up. - Credit: Simon Parkin

Engineers from Norfolk County Council were inspecting the site to discover whether it had been caused by a water leak or by underlying problems.

Most Read

But Anglian Water has now started work to complete the repairs. 

It comes just weeks after a separate sinkhole opened in a city park on Frere Road.

Police were alerted about the large hole in the Heartsease park on Tuesday, March 9, and investigations found the cavity to be three metres wide and four metres deep.

Norwich has a history of sinkholes occurring where chalk bedrock is near the surface, while collapsing medieval chalk mines have also caused holes to appear.

Most famously, the number 26 bus disappeared into a hole in Earlham Road in March 1988, when one such mine caved in.

The passengers managed to scramble off before the vehicle slipped further into the gaping gap which had opened up.

However, it is not clear at this stage what has caused this latest sink hole and how long works will take to repair it.

It opened up on Wednesday, April 1, and people living on the street intervened with their own makeshift barricades to make sure motorists did not get trapped in it.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter