Families blow away winter cobwebs on magnificent Mousehold

Carl Partridge and his wife, Megan, enjoying the New Year bank holiday at Mousehold Heath with their

Carl Partridge and his wife, Megan, enjoying the New Year bank holiday at Mousehold Heath with their daughters Margo, four, and Alma, two. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2022

Children, families, couples and dog walkers blew away the festive cobwebs and welcomed 2022 at a popular city nature spot.

Joan Spencer out for a walk with Penny, 12, enjoying the New Year bank holiday at Mousehold Heath. P

Joan Spencer out for a walk with Penny, 12, enjoying the New Year bank holiday at Mousehold Heath. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2022

On a blustery and crisp Bank Holiday Monday Mousehold Heath, between Sprowston and Norwich, was the perfect place for people to walk off the excesses of Christmas and New Year's Eve.

Sisters Emilia, six, and Eryn Miller, four, enjoying the New Year bank holiday climbing trees at Mou

Sisters Emilia, six, and Eryn Miller, four, enjoying the New Year bank holiday climbing trees at Mousehold Heath. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2022

From children hiding in and climbing up historic trees to offering wide open spaces for dogs to roam, the large wild space drew in people young and old across the city.

Tina Pinnell takes two-year-old Russell for a walk in the sunshine at Mousehold Heath. Picture: DENI

Tina Pinnell takes two-year-old Russell for a walk in the sunshine at Mousehold Heath. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2022

The 184-acre spot, made up of heathland, woodland and recreational open space is the largest of the nature reserves managed by Norwich City Council.

Teresa Malagon and Dan, enjoying the New Year bank holiday at Mousehold Heath as they walk 10-year-o

Teresa Malagon and Dan, enjoying the New Year bank holiday at Mousehold Heath as they walk 10-year-old Pandora. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2022

Offering magnificent views of the city centre it was once an area of heathland that extended to the north and east of Norwich, which has since been largely converted to woods and farmland, or lost to housing development.

Two-year-old Bobby Johnson-Lane playing hide and seek at Mousehold Heath. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Two-year-old Bobby Johnson-Lane playing hide and seek at Mousehold Heath. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2022

The old name for the area, Mushold, is interpreted as meaning mouse wood.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter