Art students interpret original masters

Peter WalshNorwich is often referred to as a fine city.But it now contains a new exhibition of fine art which has been the culmination of months of work by 12 students to try an interpret national and internationally-renowned works.Peter Walsh

Norwich is often referred to as a fine city.

But it now contains a new exhibition of fine art which has been the culmination of months of work by 12 students to try an interpret national and internationally-renowned works.

The exhibition Visual Dialogues, which opened at Norwich Castle on Saturday, showcases the results of a four month project involving A-level art students from across Norfolk.

The students, who worked with staff at the Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service (NMAS) and practicing artists from the Norwich University College of the Arts, used the format of a graphic novel to create a series of stories told through pictures or visual narratives.


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Their work re-interprets some of the castle's fine art collections, exploring the artists' themes or media in new and sometimes challenging ways.

Each art work from the Castle's collection was chosen because it spoke about nationality, regionalism or personal identity.

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Among the chosen works are John Sell Cotman's Norwich River: Afternoon (c1812 - 1819) considered by many experts to be one of his most accomplished works, local award-winning artist Ivy Smith's The Smith Family Golden Wedding (1986) and Tracey Emin's Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing (2004).

Ellie Hill, project co-ordinator from the Norwich Museums Learning Team, said: 'This project was a wonderful opportunity for art students to work with practicing artists to reinterpret nationally and internationally important fine art collections.

'Not only is their work in an exhibition but they have also learned valuable new skills which they can use at university and beyond.'

The participating students are from Wymondham College, The Hewett School Norwich, East Norfolk Sixth Form College and Norwich City College.

Throughout the project they were mentored by BA (Hons)/FdA Games Art & Design undergraduates from Norwich University College of the Arts. Lead artists on the project were Nigel Potter and Marie-Claire Isaaman.

The exhibition is on show in the Timothy Gurney Gallery at Norwich Castle until April 25 2010.

For more information visit www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk or telephone 01603 493625/495897.

Have you had your work displayed at a national exhibition? Call reporter Peter Walsh on 01603 772436 or email peter.walsh@archant.co.uk

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