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4000 more Norfolk homes get food waste service

PUBLISHED: 06:30 24 March 2010 | UPDATED: 09:04 02 July 2010

Kate Scotter

Thousands more homes are helping to divert food waste away from landfill as a Norfolk council extends its service.

Broadland District Council has this week extended to its food waste recycling collections to include 4,000 homes in Horsford, Spixworth, Rackheath, Brundall and parts of Taverham.

Thousands more homes are helping to divert food waste away from landfill as a Norfolk council extends its service.

Broadland District Council has this week extended to its food waste recycling collections to include 4,000 homes in Horsford, Spixworth, Rackheath, Brundall and parts of Taverham.

The council has already been trialling the service for about 6,000 homes in other parts of Taverham, Thorpe, Hellesdon, Sprowston and Old Catton.

The success of the scheme saw the council become one of only eight authorities nationally to share in a £1.3m fund to expand waste food collection trials.

Andy Jarvis, head of environmental services, said: “From all the feedback we've had from residents about the initial trial, they have been very pleased indeed.

“Each week, we get 75pc of households participating and are collecting on average about 2.3kg per household per week which includes food preparation, peelings and shredded paper as well as food waste.

“It's all being diverted away from landfill and it provides some good quality compost for farmers. It's a good way forward.”

About 30pc of the waste which currently goes to landfill is food. In landfill, one tonne of food waste can generate a tonne of CO2 equivalent green house gas.

Broadland District Council was able to extend its service, which first started in 2008, after it received £45,000 from Defra under the Waste Resources Action Programme (Wrap).

The money was put towards providing families with two food collection caddies, a large one for outside and a smaller one for the kitchen, and liner bags made of compostable corn starch.

Food waste collections are made weekly and the refuse is taken to a farm in Edgefield, near Holt, for in-vessel composting.

The waste is broken down under strict temperature control to ensure the finished product is sterile and is then used on farmland.

People who live in the villages which are part of the extension have welcomed the scheme.

Steve Stavridis, vice chair of Rackheath Parish Council, said: “It's early days but I think people are extremely happy to be using the new bins.

“We are pleased to get the collections - we will be proud to do anything to help the environment and improve the landfill situation.”

Cara Mason, who lives in Brundall, said: “It's handy to be able to get rid of your food waste and it'll stop the main bin from smelling as that only gets collected once a fortnight.”

For more information about the scheme, go to www.broadland.gov.uk

Are you launching a pioneering scheme in the area where you live? Call reporter Kate Scotter on 01603 772326 or email kate.scotter@archant.co.uk

What can and can't be recycled in the food waste bins

Can

Fruit

Tea and coffee grounds

Bread and pastries

Dairy products

Shredded paper

Cooked and raw meat

Cooked and raw fish

Vegetables

Egg shells

Bones

Can't

Glass

Plastic bags (compostable starch bags only will be accepted)

Food packaging

Oil or liquid fat

Tins and cans

Liquids

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