Two artists showcase their work in the John Lewis Place to Eat

From left, art shop teaching assistant Corinne Dabson, John Lewis visual merchandiser Paul Zawadzki, Nathalie Marshall of NANSA, and art shop trainee Hannah Gill, who helped hang the pictures. From left, art shop teaching assistant Corinne Dabson, John Lewis visual merchandiser Paul Zawadzki, Nathalie Marshall of NANSA, and art shop trainee Hannah Gill, who helped hang the pictures.

Mark Shields mark.shields@archant.co.uk
Friday, March 7, 2014
11:51 AM

Aspiring artists from a Norwich disability charity will have their work seen by thousands of people, after winning a spot on a city store’s new art wall.

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Members of the Norfolk and Norwich Scope Association (Nansa) hung their creations in the John Lewis Place to Eat restaurant on Tuesday, where they will stay until May.

The exhibition came about when Nansa’s fundraising manager Nathalie Marshall read an article in the Norwich Evening News about the shop’s art wall, which opened in October.

With the charity running its own community art shop project, the link-up was a natural fit.

She said: “This is a fantastic opportunity for the artists and project teams within Nansa and its artshop project to showcase their achievements.

“It shows the journey of supported services we offer at Nansa. An artist’s development, qualifications and employment skills are wonderful but it’s an individual’s self confidence that is most important and our service users should be very proud to see their work on the John Lewis art wall – we are!”

The work of two Nansa Youth and Adult Centre users, Aaron Hayden and Derek Bailey, will be displayed. They include black and white and colour portraits including one of Winston Churchill and a reproduction of Frans Hals’ The Laughing Cavalier which were produced during their art sessions.

Nansa was founded in 1954 by families from Norfolk and now provides support and advice for people of all ages with any disabilities.

In the art classes, members are asked to explore their creative interests and develop under the guidance of experienced tutors.

The works are then chosen for display in the Nansa art shop project by a team of young adults with disabilities, who achieve recognised qualifications through working in the project.

For more information, see www.nansa.org.uk.

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