Photo gallery: Stunning images of deep space captured from Norfolk

Cone Nebula in Monoceros.
An RGB composit of H alpha , O111 and sythetic green Total of 9 hours exposure .
Equipment . NEQ6 mount , FLT 98 APO refractor with SXV694 mono CCD .Guided with ST80 and loadstar.

Taken by Shaun Reynolds, a member of Norwich Astronomical Society Cone Nebula in Monoceros. An RGB composit of H alpha , O111 and sythetic green Total of 9 hours exposure . Equipment . NEQ6 mount , FLT 98 APO refractor with SXV694 mono CCD .Guided with ST80 and loadstar. Taken by Shaun Reynolds, a member of Norwich Astronomical Society

Wednesday, December 4, 2013
6:30 AM

For most of us, photogaphy is merely a case of “point and click”.

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But to capture these stunning images can take hours of exposure and painstaking processing.

The photographs of the moon and deep space were taken by members of Norwich Astronomical Society and showcase the wonders of the universe thanks to modern technology and photographic techniques.

Member Shaun Reynolds, who took up astrophotography four years ago, uses a computer and a CCD (Charged Coupled Device) camera attached to a telescope at his home in Ditchingham.

However, Mr Reynolds, 56, said that good results could still be achieved using a digital SLR camera.

The grandfather-of-four, who is an electrician by day, said: “One I’m doing is taking over two years because I have to wait for it to be in the right place in the sky.

“It’s become a big hobby, a real love and a real passion,

“It’s a constant learning curve.”

His image of a cone nebula was short-listed for an astrophotograpy award and involved using a hydrogen alpha filter to capture the red end of the visible light spectrum to highlight the nebula’s ionised gas.

The very low levels mean that long exposures are needed and astrophotographers will often use different filters to capture narrow bands of the electromagnetic spectrum and then overlay the images to build up to a final image.

Norwich Astronomical Society will be holding an open weekend on Friday and Saturday, December 6 and 7 at its Seething Observatory in Toad Lane,

Thwaite St Mary.

From 7.30pm to 9.30pm both nights, the open nights will include a talk by Dave Cook on the subject of “The Moon”.

Doors open at 7.30pm with talks starting at 8pm, unless the room fills up earlier, in which case the talk will start sooner and depending on numbers could be repeated.

Talks vary in length but generally last approximately 40 minutes and are aimed at those with a general interest in astronomy.

Children are welcome, although it is recommended for those eight years and upwards.

Admission is £3.50 for adults, £2 for adult members and £1.50 for all children.

Teas and coffee are available at the end of the talk and there will be a chance to observe through the telescopes, if the skies are clear.

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