Former Norfolk chief constable was among top 10 highest earning officers in the country

Former Norfolk Constabulary chief constable Phil Gormley. Photo: Antony Kelly. Former Norfolk Constabulary chief constable Phil Gormley. Photo: Antony Kelly.

Peter Walsh peter.walsh@archant.co.uk
Tuesday, May 27, 2014
11:33 AM

Norfolk’s former top police officer was one of the top 10 highest-earning chief constables in England and Wales, it has emerged.

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Phil Gormley, who was appointed the county’s chief constable in 2010, received benefits in kind worth £58,038 last year on top of his £168,000 salary, helping to bring his total remuneration package to £261,981.

Figures from the College of Policing showed the payment meant Mr Gormley, who left the force last summer, was in the top 10 highest earning chief officers in the country.

According to the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Norfolk and Norfolk Constabulary, Mr Gormley’s successor, Simon Bailey, is in receipt of a total package of £165,318, including a salary of £136,092.

Stephen Bett, Norfolk’s police and crime commissioner, who is responsible for hiring and firing chief constables, said Mr Gormley’s total pay included tax paid back to him on the resettlement package he received when he moved from West Midlands Constabulary where he was a deputy chief constable.

Mr Bett, who in the past has insisted it was important to offer the best pay to get the best people, said he still had that approach to that principle.

He said: “It’s no good not having the best people to do the job for you, and they will save you money in the long term.”

In terms of the difference between Mr Gormley’s package and Mr Bailey’s pay, Mr Bett said the current chief constable was a Norfolk officer who lived in the county and so did not need to be resettled like previous chief constables.

Mr Gormley left the Norfolk force in June last year after being appointed as deputy director general of the National Crime Agency (NCA) which replaced the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) in the fight against organised crime.

The move was described as a “once in a lifetime opportunity” by Mr Gormley who left his post with the very best wishes of Mr Bett who was “delighted” for Mr Gormley at landing a “very big job” and said it was a “reflection of the quality” of the top people at Norfolk Constabulary.

Have you got a crime story for the EDP? Email crime correspondent Peter Walsh at peter.walsh@archant.co.uk or newsdesk@archant.co.uk

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