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Singing and signing to inspire future generations to learn sign language

PUBLISHED: 10:46 08 February 2014 | UPDATED: 10:46 08 February 2014

Angel Road Infant and Junior School taking part in the Sign2Sing world reacord breaking attempt.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Angel Road Infant and Junior School taking part in the Sign2Sing world reacord breaking attempt. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Archant Norfolk 2014

A singing and signing world record attempt at two Norwich primary schools is helping to inspire future generations of healthworkers to learn sign language.

Angel Road Infant and Junior School taking part in the Sign2Sing world reacord breaking attempt. Front, left to right, Isobel Freestone, 8, Dani Adams, 9, Chloe Sharman, 7, Kotryna Palamaite, 6, Alfie Hammett, 9 and Ana-Mae Lee,11.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY Angel Road Infant and Junior School taking part in the Sign2Sing world reacord breaking attempt. Front, left to right, Isobel Freestone, 8, Dani Adams, 9, Chloe Sharman, 7, Kotryna Palamaite, 6, Alfie Hammett, 9 and Ana-Mae Lee,11. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Pupils at Angel Road infant and junior schools took in SignHealth’s sign2sing record attempt for the most people signing and singing on the same day.

It is the third time the schools have supported the event, which last year saw 116,980 teachers and pupils from across the country and overseas break the Guinness World Record.

Organisers are still counting up the number who took part on Wednesday, but it is hoped the record will be broken again this year.

SignHealth, the healthcare charity for vulnerable deaf children and adults, holds sign2sing to raise funds as well as to inspire future generations of doctors, nurses, lawyers, healthcare workers and others, to learn sign language.

The charity wants to see a world where deaf people are as healthy as hearing people, but many currently find it hard to get equal access to health care and health information. Because of this, deaf people are more likely to become ill.

Sue Graham, music co-ordinator for the Angel Road schools, teaches all the children the sign language alphabet, and says signing when learning helps children to remember things better and is used to underpin a lot of the children’s learning.

She said: “We think that communicating is really important and when you think about it people who are hard of hearing or deaf are really skilled at communicating with us - we are the ones who have the problem when it comes to communicating back.

“Taking part helps to raise awareness of this and many of the children say they are able to use the signs with relatives and people that they meet.”

Pupils at the junior school were joined by Year 2 children from the infant school to perform the song Get Up and Sign.

Year 1 pupils from the infant school also did the same song, while the reception class sang and signed Go Bananas.

To find out more about the event, and the charity, visit www.signhealth.org.uk
Do you have a story for the Evening News? Contact reporter Kim Briscoe on 01603 772474 or email kim.briscoe@archant.co.uk

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