£19m ‘care village’ scheme for edge of Norwich

A £19m ‘care village’ could be created on the outskirts of Norwich, to help cope with the dementia timebomb Norfolk is facing. Photo: NPS
A £19m ‘care village’ could be created on the outskirts of Norwich, to help cope with the dementia timebomb Norfolk is facing. Photo: NPS

Thursday, December 5, 2013
6:00 AM

A £19m ‘care village’ could be created on the outskirts of Norwich, to help cope with the dementia timebomb Norfolk is facing.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

Plans will be lodged tomorrow for an 80-bed specialist dementia care home and a 92-apartment housing with care scheme at part of the Three Score site in Bowthorpe.

In 2010, there were estimated to be 13,236 people in Norfolk with dementia and health experts have predicted that figure will rise to 24,204 by 2030.

And care company NorseCare has struck a deal with Norwich City Council to be given a 2.3 hectare patch of land at Three Score to build the ‘care village’.

Along with the care home and the housing with care apartments, the proposal also features a ‘village hub’, which would include a shop, cafe, hairdressers, a day care service and a community wildlife garden.

Bosses at NorseCare, which is owned by Norfolk County Council, say that ‘village hub’ could be used by the wider community, as well as people living in the care home and housing with care apartments.

NorseCare successfully bid for £4.2m of funding from the Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) and Department of Health in July, which will help kickstart the £18.9m development.

The ‘care village’ will create 118 jobs.

Karen Knight, managing director at NorseCare, said: “The Bowthorpe care village proposals envisage care the way we believe it should be and can be in the 21st century.

“The plans would give people living there spacious, en-suite accommodation, great on-site facilities and the level of care that is appropriate to their needs.

“We know that the number of people living with dementia in Norfolk is set to grow over the next few years and we need to be ready to meet this demand by providing personalised care in specially designed surroundings.

“We also know that there are lots of people who need a level of support that makes remaining in their own homes very difficult but who want to retain as much independence and privacy as possible.

“Housing with care flats, with their own kitchens, sitting rooms and bathrooms but with access to 24-hour support, really can be the best of both worlds.”

The Three Score site is the last piece of the jigsaw in the development of Bowthorpe. The city council plans to build up to 1,000 new homes on the site.

The planning application for the care village is due to be submitted to the city council tomorrow. It is likely to come before the planning committee in March.

If approved, work would begin on site in the spring with the new accommodation due to be ready for people to move into by spring 2016.

People will have the chance to view the plans, which have been designed by Barron and Smith Architects, at a drop-in event tomorrow, held between 12.30pm and 6pm at the Bowthorpe Church Centre in Bowthorpe Hall Road.

Brenda Arthur, leader of Norwich City Council and HCA partnership board member, said: “The submission of these plans brings the potential delivery of a housing with care scheme in Norwich a step closer.

“By providing the land to NorseCare we’re working in partnership towards addressing the care needs of older people in the area.”

Once submitted, the planning application will be available to view online at http://planning.norwich.gov.uk/online-applications/ where people will also be able to register and make comments on the proposal.

NorseCare is also building an 88-bed specialist dementia care home, Lydia Eva Court, in Gorleston, which is due to open next summer.

• What do you think? Write to Letters Editor, Prospect House, Rouen Road, Norwich NR1 1RE.

7 comments

  • Lets hope when it is built it will actually care for the residents, and have a budget for music therapy . Unlike a lot of 'care' home which have a zero budget at the moment. An hours music can bring back so many memories.

    Report this comment

    musicman

    Thursday, December 5, 2013

  • 'Dementia time bomb' - typical media stereotyping of the elderly, along with demographic time bomb, bed-blockers, victims of crime, pensioner's bus passes denying college students of a future and so on.. No mention that the State Retirement Pension is subject to tax, no mention of taxes being paid at local and national level in life and in death, little mention of the care and support that some pensioners give to their family and society - rant over.

    Report this comment

    Joyce

    Saturday, December 7, 2013

  • At one time - on seeing this item - I may have thought 'aha - maybe the possibility of a job' - but now I am of an age when I read it and think 'what a good idea'. Having worked in care I am realistic about the prospects of old age, and to my mind the thought of having a place where I can maintain my independence for a long as possible - in a home of my own but within the reach of help if it were needed - and knowing that more intensive support would be available should the need arise - sounds ideal. And another thought - If I was going to move from my house into a bungalow I would sell the house to fund the bungalow, so why shouldn't the same apply if I was moving from my house to a 'sheltered' bungalow. My mother in law lived with us for 18months until we couldn't manage any more, and it was the fact that she had the money from the sale of her house that gave her the freedom to choose where she would live, and not just have to be moved in to wherever 'the authorities' sent her.

    Report this comment

    MrsP

    Thursday, December 5, 2013

  • Sounds like hell on earth, a village composed of those only with dementia. Nothing normal about that. Mind it is easier for all if folks can be 'packaged' up into one area. The council must think again, the scheme is bonkers, as are the council for going ahead with it.

    Report this comment

    Gina

    Saturday, December 7, 2013

  • Care homes are a gimmick, the owners know there is money from either the state or the estate of the person in care and they will try their best to get it. It is appalling that these so called care homes are aloud to operate in the manner

    Report this comment

    Sweet cheeks

    Thursday, December 5, 2013

  • Sounds like hell on earth, a village composed of those only with dementia. Nothing normal about that. Mind it is easier for all if folks can be 'packaged' up into one area. The council must think again, the scheme is bonkers, as are the council for going ahead with it.

    Report this comment

    Gina

    Saturday, December 7, 2013

  • The dementia time bomb is a drug company and care home company driven myth aided by those in government who want an excuse to privatise NHS services. Age is not a dementia sentence, many people have grown old without becoming demented. We might see dementia rates fall if high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes are better treated in middle age. Dementia might be more obvious because fewer older people are cared for by their families than were years ago, and this home complex is a good solution. But EDP you do yourself no favours with sensationalist headlines, especially amongst those who have paid and paid into the system and now hear grumblings about what they might fairly expect in old age.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Thursday, December 5, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Homes24
Jobs24
Drive24
MyDate24
MyPhotos24
FamilyNotices24
Weddingsite

loading...

Classifieds, browse or search them online now

The Canary magazine
Order your copy of The Canary magazine

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT